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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management

Questions & Answers about The planning phase - Feasibility study question 1

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- Module: The planning phase
- Topic: Feasibility study question 1

Latest Questions

  • ANNETTE ROBINSON United States of America So repair vs. implemented or installing new system would include the financial feasibility test?
    2014-09-09 01:09:17

  • Philip Pam Nigeria what if there is an existing system, and a new one is needed or there is a need for an upgrade to an entirely different type of system, what happens in such a case?
    2014-08-15 20:08:06

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes there would be integration.
      2014-08-25 14:08:20
  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana Aspiring entrepreneurs may have an idea about the type of fruit or vegetable product that they would like to make. This can come from seeing others successfully producing a food and wanting to copy them or from talking to friends and family members about products that they think they could make. However, an idea for a business is not a sufficient reason to begin production straight away, without having thought clearly about the different aspects involved in actually running the business. Too often, people invest money in a business only to find out later that there is insufficient demand for the product or that it is not the type that customers want to buy. To reduce this risk of failure and losing money, potential producers should go through the different aspects of running their business in discussions with friends and advisers before they commit funds or try to obtain a loan. This process is known as doing a feasibility study and when the results are written down, the document is known as a business plan.
    2014-08-14 23:08:34

  • Vikram Vasant Rotkar United Kingdom What are the factors to be considered while creating a system?
    2014-07-21 18:07:47

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Number of things.
      2014-08-25 14:08:04
    • Philip Pam Nigeria factors to be considered are relative, it depends on the type of system you are creating and what you intend to achieve.
      2014-08-15 20:08:53
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 19:07:21

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 19:07:07

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 19:07:43

  • Reza Abbasi Iran What is the first question that should be asked?
    2014-06-22 15:06:44

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan What is the project doing?
      2014-08-25 14:08:14
    • Satu Korhonen Finland Can the system be created?
      2014-06-25 14:06:45
  • Reza Abbasi Iran What is the first question that should be asked?
    2014-06-20 00:06:29

  • Annette Weizbauer Germany Can the system be created?
    2014-06-15 14:06:45

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes.
      2014-08-25 14:08:35
    • Philip Pam Nigeria yes, and yes. its a matter of thinking and understanding of the entirety of the concept of the project.
      2014-08-15 20:08:21
    • Reza Abbasi Iran yes
      2014-06-20 00:06:37
    • Parhalad Saini India yes the system can be created.
      2014-06-18 05:06:52
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