Sign-up today to join over 4 million learners already on ALISON:

ALISON: Diploma in Project Management

Comments about System development life cycle - The System Development Life Cycle revision

The comment must be about:
- Module: System development life cycle
- Topic: The System Development Life Cycle revision

Latest Comments

  • Mikaya Andu South Sudan how does system development soft ware developed/
    2014-10-22 07:10:13

  • George Ugim Nigeria The entire circle structure is completely demonstrated in The systems development life cycle (SDLC) which issimply a conceptual model used in project management that describes the stages involved in an information system development project, from an initial feasibility study through maintenance of the completed application.
    2014-10-11 17:10:44

  • George Fragos Greece Is this system a series of stages that are worked through during the development of a new information system?
    2014-09-29 09:09:38

    • Isaac Clifford Nigeria yes
      2014-10-05 15:10:32
  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana If the project manager is less literate in system software, who can control the date on the SDLC?
    2014-08-14 21:08:48

    • Isaac Clifford Nigeria he or she needs to work with experts in system software.
      2014-10-05 15:10:03
    • Segedin Dragan United Arab Emirates Solution Architect from pre-sales .. or as part of PM team during delivery
      2014-09-28 07:09:02
    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Senior management.
      2014-08-25 12:08:18
  • Vikram Vasant Rotkar United Kingdom What is the recommended a s apossible risk response type for an opportunity?
    2014-07-21 16:07:09

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Taking quick decision.
      2014-08-25 12:08:19
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia The principal objective of a feasibility study is to determine whether the system is desirable on the basis of long-term plans, strategic initiatives, and a cost-benefit analysis. System analysis provides a detailed answer to the question, What will the new system do? The next stage, system design, results in an extensive blueprint for how the new system will be organized. During the programming and testing stage, the individual software modules of the system are developed, tested, and integrated into a coherent operational system. Further levels of testing ensure continuing quality control. Installation includes final testing of the system in the work environment and conversion of organizational operations to the new system. The later stages of development include such implementation activities as training users and modifying the organizational processes in which the system will be used.
    2014-07-20 18:07:21

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia The principal objective of a feasibility study is to determine whether the system is desirable on the basis of long-term plans, strategic initiatives, and a cost-benefit analysis. System analysis provides a detailed answer to the question, What will the new system do? The next stage, system design, results in an extensive blueprint for how the new system will be organized. During the programming and testing stage, the individual software modules of the system are developed, tested, and integrated into a coherent operational system. Further levels of testing ensure continuing quality control. Installation includes final testing of the system in the work environment and conversion of organizational operations to the new system. The later stages of development include such implementation activities as training users and modifying the organizational processes in which the system will be used.
    2014-07-20 18:07:06

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia The principal objective of a feasibility study is to determine whether the system is desirable on the basis of long-term plans, strategic initiatives, and a cost-benefit analysis. System analysis provides a detailed answer to the question, What will the new system do? The next stage, system design, results in an extensive blueprint for how the new system will be organized. During the programming and testing stage, the individual software modules of the system are developed, tested, and integrated into a coherent operational system. Further levels of testing ensure continuing quality control. Installation includes final testing of the system in the work environment and conversion of organizational operations to the new system. The later stages of development include such implementation activities as training users and modifying the organizational processes in which the system will be used.
    2014-07-20 18:07:52

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia The principal objective of a feasibility study is to determine whether the system is desirable on the basis of long-term plans, strategic initiatives, and a cost-benefit analysis. System analysis provides a detailed answer to the question, What will the new system do? The next stage, system design, results in an extensive blueprint for how the new system will be organized. During the programming and testing stage, the individual software modules of the system are developed, tested, and integrated into a coherent operational system. Further levels of testing ensure continuing quality control. Installation includes final testing of the system in the work environment and conversion of organizational operations to the new system. The later stages of development include such implementation activities as training users and modifying the organizational processes in which the system will be used.
    2014-07-20 18:07:25

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia The principal objective of a feasibility study is to determine whether the system is desirable on the basis of long-term plans, strategic initiatives, and a cost-benefit analysis. System analysis provides a detailed answer to the question, What will the new system do? The next stage, system design, results in an extensive blueprint for how the new system will be organized. During the programming and testing stage, the individual software modules of the system are developed, tested, and integrated into a coherent operational system. Further levels of testing ensure continuing quality control. Installation includes final testing of the system in the work environment and conversion of organizational operations to the new system. The later stages of development include such implementation activities as training users and modifying the organizational processes in which the system will be used.
    2014-07-20 18:07:11

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor. In-house development When an information system is developed internally by an organization, one of two methods is used: life-cycle development or rapid application development (RAD).
    2014-07-20 18:07:47

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor. In-house development When an information system is developed internally by an organization, one of two methods is used: life-cycle development or rapid application development (RAD).
    2014-07-20 18:07:33

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Managing information systems Information system infrastructure and architecture A well-designed information system rests on a coherent foundation that supports modifications as new business or administrative initiatives arise. Known as the information system infrastructure, the foundation consists of core telecommunications networks, databases, software, hardware, and procedures. Managed by various specialists, information systems frequently incorporate the use of general information and telecommunication utilities, such as the Internet. Owing to business globalization, an organization's infrastructure often crosses many national boundaries. Creating and maintaining such a complex infrastructure requires extensive planning and consistent implementation to handle strategic corporate initiatives, transformations, mergers, and acquisitions. When organized into a coherent whole, the specific information systems that support operations, management, and knowledge work constitute the system architecture of an organization. Clearly, an organization's long-term general strategic plans must be considered when designing an information system infrastructure and architecture. Organization of information services An information services unit is typically in charge of an organization's information systems. Where information services are centralized, this unit is responsible for planning, acquiring, operating, and maintaining information systems for the entire organization. In decentralized structures the central unit is responsible only for planning and maintaining the infrastructure, while business and administrative specialists provide systems and services for their own units. Additionally, a variety of intermediate organizational forms are possible. In many organizations, information systems are headed by a chief information officer (CIO). The activities of information services are usually supervised by a steering committee, consisting of the executives representing various functional units of the organization. As described in the next section, Information systems security and control, a vital responsibility of information services is to ensure uninterrupted service in the face of many security threats.
    2014-07-20 18:07:47

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Managing information systems Information system infrastructure and architecture A well-designed information system rests on a coherent foundation that supports modifications as new business or administrative initiatives arise. Known as the information system infrastructure, the foundation consists of core telecommunications networks, databases, software, hardware, and procedures. Managed by various specialists, information systems frequently incorporate the use of general information and telecommunication utilities, such as the Internet. Owing to business globalization, an organization's infrastructure often crosses many national boundaries. Creating and maintaining such a complex infrastructure requires extensive planning and consistent implementation to handle strategic corporate initiatives, transformations, mergers, and acquisitions. When organized into a coherent whole, the specific information systems that support operations, management, and knowledge work constitute the system architecture of an organization. Clearly, an organization's long-term general strategic plans must be considered when designing an information system infrastructure and architecture. Organization of information services An information services unit is typically in charge of an organization's information systems. Where information services are centralized, this unit is responsible for planning, acquiring, operating, and maintaining information systems for the entire organization. In decentralized structures the central unit is responsible only for planning and maintaining the infrastructure, while business and administrative specialists provide systems and services for their own units. Additionally, a variety of intermediate organizational forms are possible. In many organizations, information systems are headed by a chief information officer (CIO). The activities of information services are usually supervised by a steering committee, consisting of the executives representing various functional units of the organization. As described in the next section, Information systems security and control, a vital responsibility of information services is to ensure uninterrupted service in the face of many security threats.
    2014-07-20 17:07:18

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Managing information systems Information system infrastructure and architecture A well-designed information system rests on a coherent foundation that supports modifications as new business or administrative initiatives arise. Known as the information system infrastructure, the foundation consists of core telecommunications networks, databases, software, hardware, and procedures. Managed by various specialists, information systems frequently incorporate the use of general information and telecommunication utilities, such as the Internet. Owing to business globalization, an organization's infrastructure often crosses many national boundaries. Creating and maintaining such a complex infrastructure requires extensive planning and consistent implementation to handle strategic corporate initiatives, transformations, mergers, and acquisitions. When organized into a coherent whole, the specific information systems that support operations, management, and knowledge work constitute the system architecture of an organization. Clearly, an organization's long-term general strategic plans must be considered when designing an information system infrastructure and architecture. Organization of information services An information services unit is typically in charge of an organization's information systems. Where information services are centralized, this unit is responsible for planning, acquiring, operating, and maintaining information systems for the entire organization. In decentralized structures the central unit is responsible only for planning and maintaining the infrastructure, while business and administrative specialists provide systems and services for their own units. Additionally, a variety of intermediate organizational forms are possible. In many organizations, information systems are headed by a chief information officer (CIO). The activities of information services are usually supervised by a steering committee, consisting of the executives representing various functional units of the organization. As described in the next section, Information systems security and control, a vital responsibility of information services is to ensure uninterrupted service in the face of many security threats.
    2014-07-20 17:07:00

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Managing information systems Information system infrastructure and architecture A well-designed information system rests on a coherent foundation that supports modifications as new business or administrative initiatives arise. Known as the information system infrastructure, the foundation consists of core telecommunications networks, databases, software, hardware, and procedures. Managed by various specialists, information systems frequently incorporate the use of general information and telecommunication utilities, such as the Internet. Owing to business globalization, an organization's infrastructure often crosses many national boundaries. Creating and maintaining such a complex infrastructure requires extensive planning and consistent implementation to handle strategic corporate initiatives, transformations, mergers, and acquisitions. When organized into a coherent whole, the specific information systems that support operations, management, and knowledge work constitute the system architecture of an organization. Clearly, an organization's long-term general strategic plans must be considered when designing an information system infrastructure and architecture. Organization of information services An information services unit is typically in charge of an organization's information systems. Where information services are centralized, this unit is responsible for planning, acquiring, operating, and maintaining information systems for the entire organization. In decentralized structures the central unit is responsible only for planning and maintaining the infrastructure, while business and administrative specialists provide systems and services for their own units. Additionally, a variety of intermediate organizational forms are possible. In many organizations, information systems are headed by a chief information officer (CIO). The activities of information services are usually supervised by a steering committee, consisting of the executives representing various functional units of the organization. As described in the next section, Information systems security and control, a vital responsibility of information services is to ensure uninterrupted service in the face of many security threats.
    2014-07-20 17:07:46

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Managing information systems Information system infrastructure and architecture A well-designed information system rests on a coherent foundation that supports modifications as new business or administrative initiatives arise. Known as the information system infrastructure, the foundation consists of core telecommunications networks, databases, software, hardware, and procedures. Managed by various specialists, information systems frequently incorporate the use of general information and telecommunication utilities, such as the Internet. Owing to business globalization, an organization's infrastructure often crosses many national boundaries. Creating and maintaining such a complex infrastructure requires extensive planning and consistent implementation to handle strategic corporate initiatives, transformations, mergers, and acquisitions. When organized into a coherent whole, the specific information systems that support operations, management, and knowledge work constitute the system architecture of an organization. Clearly, an organization's long-term general strategic plans must be considered when designing an information system infrastructure and architecture. Organization of information services An information services unit is typically in charge of an organization's information systems. Where information services are centralized, this unit is responsible for planning, acquiring, operating, and maintaining information systems for the entire organization. In decentralized structures the central unit is responsible only for planning and maintaining the infrastructure, while business and administrative specialists provide systems and services for their own units. Additionally, a variety of intermediate organizational forms are possible. In many organizations, information systems are headed by a chief information officer (CIO). The activities of information services are usually supervised by a steering committee, consisting of the executives representing various functional units of the organization. As described in the next section, Information systems security and control, a vital responsibility of information services is to ensure uninterrupted service in the face of many security threats.
    2014-07-20 17:07:24

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Managing information systems Information system infrastructure and architecture A well-designed information system rests on a coherent foundation that supports modifications as new business or administrative initiatives arise. Known as the information system infrastructure, the foundation consists of core telecommunications networks, databases, software, hardware, and procedures. Managed by various specialists, information systems frequently incorporate the use of general information and telecommunication utilities, such as the Internet. Owing to business globalization, an organization's infrastructure often crosses many national boundaries. Creating and maintaining such a complex infrastructure requires extensive planning and consistent implementation to handle strategic corporate initiatives, transformations, mergers, and acquisitions. When organized into a coherent whole, the specific information systems that support operations, management, and knowledge work constitute the system architecture of an organization. Clearly, an organization's long-term general strategic plans must be considered when designing an information system infrastructure and architecture. Organization of information services An information services unit is typically in charge of an organization's information systems. Where information services are centralized, this unit is responsible for planning, acquiring, operating, and maintaining information systems for the entire organization. In decentralized structures the central unit is responsible only for planning and maintaining the infrastructure, while business and administrative specialists provide systems and services for their own units. Additionally, a variety of intermediate organizational forms are possible. In many organizations, information systems are headed by a chief information officer (CIO). The activities of information services are usually supervised by a steering committee, consisting of the executives representing various functional units of the organization. As described in the next section, Information systems security and control, a vital responsibility of information services is to ensure uninterrupted service in the face of many security threats.
    2014-07-20 17:07:10

  • Richmond Asuah Nkansah Ghana Is the planning stage in sdlc different from the previous planning phase discussed?
    2014-07-06 14:07:30

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan It is the same planning.
      2014-08-25 12:08:23
  • Satu Korhonen Finland What are the steps in the analysis phase?
    2014-06-24 19:06:34

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan They many depending on the project size.
      2014-08-25 12:08:03
Loading Menu