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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management

Questions & Answers about System development life cycle - The use/evaluation phase

The Question must be about:
- Module: System development life cycle
- Topic: The use/evaluation phase

Latest Questions

  • George Fragos Greece Can we use the evaluation results and share as well??
    2014-09-29 10:09:31

  • ANNETTE ROBINSON United States of America When are the revisions made during the evaluation phase if any?
    2014-09-09 00:09:16

    • Segedin Dragan United Arab Emirates shouldn't be revisions in evaluation phase (this phase should be done quick)
      2014-09-28 08:09:13
  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana I understand that evaluation must meet the planning phase, But what will happen if the evaluation does not meet the planning phase?
    2014-08-14 22:08:55

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Then the decision should be taken to address some issues that cause the reason why it evaluation can not meeting planning phase.
      2014-08-25 12:08:43
  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana What will happen if the evaluation does not meet the planning phase?
    2014-08-14 22:08:40

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan It is repetited.
      2014-08-25 12:08:04
  • Vikram Vasant Rotkar United Kingdom What is role of business case in evaluation?
    2014-07-21 17:07:53

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Is the subject to be checked.
      2014-08-25 12:08:07
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Managing information systems Information system infrastructure and architecture A well-designed information system rests on a coherent foundation that supports modifications as new business or administrative initiatives arise. Known as the information system infrastructure, the foundation consists of core telecommunications networks, databases, software, hardware, and procedures. Managed by various specialists, information systems frequently incorporate the use of general information and telecommunication utilities, such as the Internet. Owing to business globalization, an organization's infrastructure often crosses many national boundaries. Creating and maintaining such a complex infrastructure requires extensive planning and consistent implementation to handle strategic corporate initiatives, transformations, mergers, and acquisitions. When organized into a coherent whole, the specific information systems that support operations, management, and knowledge work constitute the system architecture of an organization. Clearly, an organization's long-term general strategic plans must be considered when designing an information system infrastructure and architecture. Organization of information services An information services unit is typically in charge of an organization's information systems. Where information services are centralized, this unit is responsible for planning, acquiring, operating, and maintaining information systems for the entire organization. In decentralized structures the central unit is responsible only for planning and maintaining the infrastructure, while business and administrative specialists provide systems and services for their own units. Additionally, a variety of intermediate organizational forms are possible. In many organizations, information systems are headed by a chief information officer (CIO). The activities of information services are usually supervised by a steering committee, consisting of the executives representing various functional units of the organization. As described in the next section, Information systems security and control, a vital responsibility of information services is to ensure uninterrupted service in the face of many security threats.
    2014-07-20 18:07:43

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Managing information systems Information system infrastructure and architecture A well-designed information system rests on a coherent foundation that supports modifications as new business or administrative initiatives arise. Known as the information system infrastructure, the foundation consists of core telecommunications networks, databases, software, hardware, and procedures. Managed by various specialists, information systems frequently incorporate the use of general information and telecommunication utilities, such as the Internet. Owing to business globalization, an organization's infrastructure often crosses many national boundaries. Creating and maintaining such a complex infrastructure requires extensive planning and consistent implementation to handle strategic corporate initiatives, transformations, mergers, and acquisitions. When organized into a coherent whole, the specific information systems that support operations, management, and knowledge work constitute the system architecture of an organization. Clearly, an organization's long-term general strategic plans must be considered when designing an information system infrastructure and architecture. Organization of information services An information services unit is typically in charge of an organization's information systems. Where information services are centralized, this unit is responsible for planning, acquiring, operating, and maintaining information systems for the entire organization. In decentralized structures the central unit is responsible only for planning and maintaining the infrastructure, while business and administrative specialists provide systems and services for their own units. Additionally, a variety of intermediate organizational forms are possible. In many organizations, information systems are headed by a chief information officer (CIO). The activities of information services are usually supervised by a steering committee, consisting of the executives representing various functional units of the organization. As described in the next section, Information systems security and control, a vital responsibility of information services is to ensure uninterrupted service in the face of many security threats.
    2014-07-20 18:07:23

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Managing information systems Information system infrastructure and architecture A well-designed information system rests on a coherent foundation that supports modifications as new business or administrative initiatives arise. Known as the information system infrastructure, the foundation consists of core telecommunications networks, databases, software, hardware, and procedures. Managed by various specialists, information systems frequently incorporate the use of general information and telecommunication utilities, such as the Internet. Owing to business globalization, an organization's infrastructure often crosses many national boundaries. Creating and maintaining such a complex infrastructure requires extensive planning and consistent implementation to handle strategic corporate initiatives, transformations, mergers, and acquisitions. When organized into a coherent whole, the specific information systems that support operations, management, and knowledge work constitute the system architecture of an organization. Clearly, an organization's long-term general strategic plans must be considered when designing an information system infrastructure and architecture. Organization of information services An information services unit is typically in charge of an organization's information systems. Where information services are centralized, this unit is responsible for planning, acquiring, operating, and maintaining information systems for the entire organization. In decentralized structures the central unit is responsible only for planning and maintaining the infrastructure, while business and administrative specialists provide systems and services for their own units. Additionally, a variety of intermediate organizational forms are possible. In many organizations, information systems are headed by a chief information officer (CIO). The activities of information services are usually supervised by a steering committee, consisting of the executives representing various functional units of the organization. As described in the next section, Information systems security and control, a vital responsibility of information services is to ensure uninterrupted service in the face of many security threats.
    2014-07-20 18:07:05

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Managing information systems Information system infrastructure and architecture A well-designed information system rests on a coherent foundation that supports modifications as new business or administrative initiatives arise. Known as the information system infrastructure, the foundation consists of core telecommunications networks, databases, software, hardware, and procedures. Managed by various specialists, information systems frequently incorporate the use of general information and telecommunication utilities, such as the Internet. Owing to business globalization, an organization's infrastructure often crosses many national boundaries. Creating and maintaining such a complex infrastructure requires extensive planning and consistent implementation to handle strategic corporate initiatives, transformations, mergers, and acquisitions. When organized into a coherent whole, the specific information systems that support operations, management, and knowledge work constitute the system architecture of an organization. Clearly, an organization's long-term general strategic plans must be considered when designing an information system infrastructure and architecture. Organization of information services An information services unit is typically in charge of an organization's information systems. Where information services are centralized, this unit is responsible for planning, acquiring, operating, and maintaining information systems for the entire organization. In decentralized structures the central unit is responsible only for planning and maintaining the infrastructure, while business and administrative specialists provide systems and services for their own units. Additionally, a variety of intermediate organizational forms are possible. In many organizations, information systems are headed by a chief information officer (CIO). The activities of information services are usually supervised by a steering committee, consisting of the executives representing various functional units of the organization. As described in the next section, Information systems security and control, a vital responsibility of information services is to ensure uninterrupted service in the face of many security threats.
    2014-07-20 18:07:47

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia he principal objective of a feasibility study is to determine whether the system is desirable on the basis of long-term plans, strategic initiatives, and a cost-benefit analysis. System analysis provides a detailed answer to the question, What will the new system do? The next stage, system design, results in an extensive blueprint for how the new system will be organized. During the programming and testing stage, the individual software modules of the system are developed, tested, and integrated into a coherent operational system. Further levels of testing ensure continuing quality control. Installation includes final testing of the system in the work environment and conversion of organizational operations to the new system. The later stages of development include such implementation activities as training users and modifying the organizational processes in which the system will be used. Life-cycle development is frequently faulted for its long development times and voluminous documentation requirements—and, in some instances, for its failure to fulfill the user's requirements at the end of the long development road. Increasingly, life-cycle development has been replaced by a process known as rapid application development. With RAD a preliminary working version of an application, or prototype, is built quickly and inexpensively, albeit imperfectly. This prototype is turned over to the users, their reactions are collected, suggested modifications are incorporated, and successive prototype versions eventually evolve into the complete system. Sometimes RAD and life-cycle development are combined: a prototype is produced to determine user requirements during the initial system analysis stage, after which life-cycle development takes over. After an installed system is handed over to its users and operations personnel, it will almost invariably be modified extensively over its useful life in a process known as system maintenance. For instance, if a large system takes 2 years to develop, it will typically be used and maintained for some 5 to 10 years or even longer. Most maintenance is to adjust the system to the organization's changing needs and to new equipment and system software, but inevitably some maintenance involves correcting design errors and exterminating software “bugs” as they are discovered.
    2014-07-20 18:07:12

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan why are you answering the question that was not asked?
      2014-08-25 12:08:06
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia he principal objective of a feasibility study is to determine whether the system is desirable on the basis of long-term plans, strategic initiatives, and a cost-benefit analysis. System analysis provides a detailed answer to the question, What will the new system do? The next stage, system design, results in an extensive blueprint for how the new system will be organized. During the programming and testing stage, the individual software modules of the system are developed, tested, and integrated into a coherent operational system. Further levels of testing ensure continuing quality control. Installation includes final testing of the system in the work environment and conversion of organizational operations to the new system. The later stages of development include such implementation activities as training users and modifying the organizational processes in which the system will be used. Life-cycle development is frequently faulted for its long development times and voluminous documentation requirements—and, in some instances, for its failure to fulfill the user's requirements at the end of the long development road. Increasingly, life-cycle development has been replaced by a process known as rapid application development. With RAD a preliminary working version of an application, or prototype, is built quickly and inexpensively, albeit imperfectly. This prototype is turned over to the users, their reactions are collected, suggested modifications are incorporated, and successive prototype versions eventually evolve into the complete system. Sometimes RAD and life-cycle development are combined: a prototype is produced to determine user requirements during the initial system analysis stage, after which life-cycle development takes over. After an installed system is handed over to its users and operations personnel, it will almost invariably be modified extensively over its useful life in a process known as system maintenance. For instance, if a large system takes 2 years to develop, it will typically be used and maintained for some 5 to 10 years or even longer. Most maintenance is to adjust the system to the organization's changing needs and to new equipment and system software, but inevitably some maintenance involves correcting design errors and exterminating software “bugs” as they are discovered.
    2014-07-20 18:07:04

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia he principal objective of a feasibility study is to determine whether the system is desirable on the basis of long-term plans, strategic initiatives, and a cost-benefit analysis. System analysis provides a detailed answer to the question, What will the new system do? The next stage, system design, results in an extensive blueprint for how the new system will be organized. During the programming and testing stage, the individual software modules of the system are developed, tested, and integrated into a coherent operational system. Further levels of testing ensure continuing quality control. Installation includes final testing of the system in the work environment and conversion of organizational operations to the new system. The later stages of development include such implementation activities as training users and modifying the organizational processes in which the system will be used. Life-cycle development is frequently faulted for its long development times and voluminous documentation requirements—and, in some instances, for its failure to fulfill the user's requirements at the end of the long development road. Increasingly, life-cycle development has been replaced by a process known as rapid application development. With RAD a preliminary working version of an application, or prototype, is built quickly and inexpensively, albeit imperfectly. This prototype is turned over to the users, their reactions are collected, suggested modifications are incorporated, and successive prototype versions eventually evolve into the complete system. Sometimes RAD and life-cycle development are combined: a prototype is produced to determine user requirements during the initial system analysis stage, after which life-cycle development takes over. After an installed system is handed over to its users and operations personnel, it will almost invariably be modified extensively over its useful life in a process known as system maintenance. For instance, if a large system takes 2 years to develop, it will typically be used and maintained for some 5 to 10 years or even longer. Most maintenance is to adjust the system to the organization's changing needs and to new equipment and system software, but inevitably some maintenance involves correcting design errors and exterminating software “bugs” as they are discovered.
    2014-07-20 18:07:42

  • Olorunmolu Bodun Stephen Nigeria What is the best way to audit the system
    2014-07-15 22:07:06

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan By checking the records and compare it with the actual results.
      2014-08-25 12:08:59
  • Raymond Siwale Botswana why evaluate?
    2014-07-11 23:07:03

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan To cover number of things such as accuracy, effectiveness and efficiency and many others.
      2014-08-25 12:08:44
    • Glyn Chapman United Kingdom The best way of finding out if the the new implementation of a system is / has been successful is to analyse / evaluate it therefore giving a clear and precise indication of whether the implementation has achieved the aims / targets / results of the actual project.
      2014-07-21 18:07:33
  • ToeToe Aung Singapore Is it the same with testing as important as evaluation phase? Why doesn't include the testing phase?
    2014-06-21 09:06:13

  • Reza Abbasi Iran What is the phase of the review ? Say the name?
    2014-06-19 23:06:25

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Evaluation.
      2014-08-25 12:08:49
  • Parhalad Saini India what are the different step in evaluation phase?
    2014-06-17 11:06:17

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan There are mainly four steps Using system,auditing the system, maintaining the system and re-engineering proposals.
      2014-08-25 12:08:46
    • Reza Abbasi Iran using the system auditing the system (including a post implementation review) maintaining the system re-engineering proposals.
      2014-06-19 23:06:28
  • Annette Weizbauer Germany The initially defined objectives from which phase need to be met within the use/evaluation phase?
    2014-06-15 12:06:43

    • Shazia Adams South Africa the system should be in full use to meet the objectives that were initially identified in the planning phase.
      2014-07-07 11:07:00
    • ojo taiwo Nigeria PLANNING PHASE
      2014-06-20 12:06:38
    • Reza Abbasi Iran For each of these methods, some or all of the following criteria may be applied: efficiency (time, cost, effort) effectiveness (timeliness, accuracy, relevance, completeness) maintainability
      2014-06-19 23:06:32
    • Parhalad Saini India efficiency (time, cost, effort), effectiveness (timeliness, accuracy, relevance, completeness), maintainability
      2014-06-17 11:06:19
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