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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management


Comments about System development life cycle - The System Development Life Cycle Overview

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- Module: System development life cycle
- Topic: The System Development Life Cycle Overview

Latest Comments

  • Zinabie Tadesse Gebremedhin Ethiopia SDLC are usually the result of a process that identifies problems and creates solutions to them. The most successful information technology systems are those that are able to properly solve problems within an organisation. The development of information products and systems will usually follow a process that involves a number of distinct phases. There are a number of names that this process is given, including: system life cycle, system development life cycle and system development methodology. The Five phase of SDLC 1. Planning phase 2.Analysis phase 3. Designing phase 4. Implementation phase 5 Use / Evaluation Phase
    2014-11-25 06:11:42

  • Aggrey Kegome Kenya Successful Information Technology systems must be able to properly solve problems within an organization.
    2014-11-20 13:11:10

  • shady Maher Saudi Arabia What are SDLC and what is this phases ?
    2014-11-19 18:11:45

  • ESSOTOLOME BODJO China There are a number of names that this process is given, including: system life cycle, system development life cycle and system development methodology
    2014-11-19 06:11:50

  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya Each of the phases has a series of events or steps that are completed in order to arrive at the final produc
    2014-11-16 04:11:20

    • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya System Development Life Cycle, consist of five phases which are; Planning Phase, Analysis phase, Design Phase, Implementation Phase, and evaluation phase.
      2014-11-16 04:11:07
  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya Each of the phases has a series of events or steps that are completed in order to arrive at the final produc
    2014-11-16 04:11:30

  • Md Shohel Mahmud Bangladesh So this life cycle has different types and it is not just the result only from nothing and sudden but it is the result of a process consists of problems and solutions.
    2014-11-16 04:11:47

  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya What is the difference between SDLC and project life cycle?
    2014-11-16 03:11:37

  • Nothando Gumpo United Kingdom System Development Life Cycle, consist of five phases which are; Planning Phase, Analysis phase, Design Phase, Implementation Phase, User and evaluation phase. All five are important and vital for every project.
    2014-11-06 00:11:03

    • Simba Gavu Zimbabwe yes that is true
      2014-11-07 09:11:27
  • Janvier Nyandamu Rwanda System Development Life Cycle, is mainly classified into; Planning Phase, Analysis phase, Design Phase, Implementation Phase, Use and evaluation phase.
    2014-11-05 11:11:18

  • Ralph Webster South Africa nformation systems and products do not just 'happen' - they are usually the result of a process that identifies problems and creates solutions to them. The most successful information technology systems are those that are able to properly solve problems within an organisation. The development of information products and systems will usually follow a process that involves a number of distinct phases. There are a number of names that this process is given, including: system life cycle, system development life cycle and system development methodology. We will use the term system development life cycle (SDLC) however, any of the other terms could be used interchangeably. In this job advertisement you will see that 'SDLC' has been used as a standard industry term. Each of the phases has a series of events or steps that are completed in order to arrive at the final product.
    2014-10-19 06:10:16

  • Segedin Dragan United Arab Emirates As the SDLC (systems development life cycle) is only a conceptual model used in project management that describes the stages involved in an information system ... what about other non-IS delivery? Is possible to have something as is SDLC in building/construction area, banking sector, agriculture .. is any universal conceptual model?
    2014-09-28 07:09:47

  • Robert Robert Nigeria in project life cycle is there any particular measure applied by project managers?
    2014-09-15 16:09:49

  • phouvong Thammavongsa Lao People's Is there any template of project management on this program?
    2014-09-09 03:09:29

  • Saw Minyau Germany Are there another functions used in Agricultural economic for he systems development life cycle (SDLC) ?
    2014-08-15 19:08:05

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes there five systems for any project.
      2014-08-24 19:08:44
  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana The systems development life cycle (SDLC) is a conceptual model used in project management that describes the stages involved in an information system development project, from an initial feasibility study through maintenance of the completed application.
    2014-08-14 19:08:22

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes it is true statement.
      2014-08-24 19:08:15
  • Vikram Vasant Rotkar United Kingdom What are the recommended levels of plans?
    2014-07-21 16:07:36

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan That they should be relevant and realistic.
      2014-08-24 19:08:01
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia he principal objective of a feasibility study is to determine whether the system is desirable on the basis of long-term plans, strategic initiatives, and a cost-benefit analysis. System analysis provides a detailed answer to the question, What will the new system do? The next stage, system design, results in an extensive blueprint for how the new system will be organized. During the programming and testing stage, the individual software modules of the system are developed, tested, and integrated into a coherent operational system. Further levels of testing ensure continuing quality control. Installation includes final testing of the system in the work environment and conversion of organizational operations to the new system. The later stages of development include such implementation activities as training users and modifying the organizational processes in which the system will be used. Life-cycle development is frequently faulted for its long development times and voluminous documentation requirements—and, in some instances, for its failure to fulfill the user's requirements at the end of the long development road. Increasingly, life-cycle development has been replaced by a process known as rapid application development. With RAD a preliminary working version of an application, or prototype, is built quickly and inexpensively, albeit imperfectly. This prototype is turned over to the users, their reactions are collected, suggested modifications are incorporated, and successive prototype versions eventually evolve into the complete system. Sometimes RAD and life-cycle development are combined: a prototype is produced to determine user requirements during the initial system analysis stage, after which life-cycle development takes over. After an installed system is handed over to its users and operations personnel, it will almost invariably be modified extensively over its useful life in a process known as system maintenance. For instance, if a large system takes 2 years to develop, it will typically be used and maintained for some 5 to 10 years or even longer. Most maintenance is to adjust the system to the organization's changing needs and to new equipment and system software, but inevitably some maintenance involves correcting design errors and exterminating software “bugs” as they are discovered.
    2014-07-20 17:07:01

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia he principal objective of a feasibility study is to determine whether the system is desirable on the basis of long-term plans, strategic initiatives, and a cost-benefit analysis. System analysis provides a detailed answer to the question, What will the new system do? The next stage, system design, results in an extensive blueprint for how the new system will be organized. During the programming and testing stage, the individual software modules of the system are developed, tested, and integrated into a coherent operational system. Further levels of testing ensure continuing quality control. Installation includes final testing of the system in the work environment and conversion of organizational operations to the new system. The later stages of development include such implementation activities as training users and modifying the organizational processes in which the system will be used. Life-cycle development is frequently faulted for its long development times and voluminous documentation requirements—and, in some instances, for its failure to fulfill the user's requirements at the end of the long development road. Increasingly, life-cycle development has been replaced by a process known as rapid application development. With RAD a preliminary working version of an application, or prototype, is built quickly and inexpensively, albeit imperfectly. This prototype is turned over to the users, their reactions are collected, suggested modifications are incorporated, and successive prototype versions eventually evolve into the complete system. Sometimes RAD and life-cycle development are combined: a prototype is produced to determine user requirements during the initial system analysis stage, after which life-cycle development takes over. After an installed system is handed over to its users and operations personnel, it will almost invariably be modified extensively over its useful life in a process known as system maintenance. For instance, if a large system takes 2 years to develop, it will typically be used and maintained for some 5 to 10 years or even longer. Most maintenance is to adjust the system to the organization's changing needs and to new equipment and system software, but inevitably some maintenance involves correcting design errors and exterminating software “bugs” as they are discovered.
    2014-07-20 17:07:53

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan The same as above.
      2014-08-24 19:08:56
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia he principal objective of a feasibility study is to determine whether the system is desirable on the basis of long-term plans, strategic initiatives, and a cost-benefit analysis. System analysis provides a detailed answer to the question, What will the new system do? The next stage, system design, results in an extensive blueprint for how the new system will be organized. During the programming and testing stage, the individual software modules of the system are developed, tested, and integrated into a coherent operational system. Further levels of testing ensure continuing quality control. Installation includes final testing of the system in the work environment and conversion of organizational operations to the new system. The later stages of development include such implementation activities as training users and modifying the organizational processes in which the system will be used. Life-cycle development is frequently faulted for its long development times and voluminous documentation requirements—and, in some instances, for its failure to fulfill the user's requirements at the end of the long development road. Increasingly, life-cycle development has been replaced by a process known as rapid application development. With RAD a preliminary working version of an application, or prototype, is built quickly and inexpensively, albeit imperfectly. This prototype is turned over to the users, their reactions are collected, suggested modifications are incorporated, and successive prototype versions eventually evolve into the complete system. Sometimes RAD and life-cycle development are combined: a prototype is produced to determine user requirements during the initial system analysis stage, after which life-cycle development takes over. After an installed system is handed over to its users and operations personnel, it will almost invariably be modified extensively over its useful life in a process known as system maintenance. For instance, if a large system takes 2 years to develop, it will typically be used and maintained for some 5 to 10 years or even longer. Most maintenance is to adjust the system to the organization's changing needs and to new equipment and system software, but inevitably some maintenance involves correcting design errors and exterminating software “bugs” as they are discovered.
    2014-07-20 17:07:37

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