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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management

Questions & Answers about Project management documentation - Types of documentation

The Question must be about:
- Module: Project management documentation
- Topic: Types of documentation

Latest Questions

  • ANNETTE ROBINSON United States of America During the project phase, is documentation revised at any step of the phase or is it revised upon the upon evaluation.
    2014-09-08 22:09:20

    • Mutea Al Nuzely United States of America Phase 1, investigation Involves the proper wayto the project could be completed
      2014-09-16 15:09:21
  • George Fragos Greece electronic mode of documentation is comparable with the documentation?
    2014-08-30 16:08:23

  • ARIHO SIMPLISIO Uganda Is documentation basically used in operation ?
    2014-08-20 10:08:14

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes of course.
      2014-08-24 14:08:32
  • Tlaki Nnete South Africa Documents are very important as they show where and when the project started and ends, and the are useful when doing your presentation about your project.
    2014-08-19 12:08:50

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Correct.
      2014-08-24 14:08:03
  • Je Rouse United Kingdom The documentation that I use is usually a guide to show the inviduals in the project carry out certain tasks.
    2014-08-07 15:08:14

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan not only that but to show to the future and developers how it was done and why.
      2014-08-24 14:08:26
  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana Documentation varies for specific job done, either commencement or complete job. They are essential to track records in all aspects of business.
    2014-07-26 07:07:25

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Exactly.
      2014-08-24 14:08:49
    • Muhammed Faheem India Some documentation helps for future reference too.
      2014-08-02 07:08:28
  • Vikram Vasant Rotkar United Kingdom What about electronic mode of documentation?
    2014-07-21 17:07:06

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan They are also important.
      2014-08-24 14:08:22
    • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana Both hard and soft copies documentation are essential based on the level of job it carryout.
      2014-07-26 07:07:22
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Documentation flow The paperwork that accompanies the flow of physical product is considered to be the documentation flow. A bill of lading is the contract between the shipper and carrier. A packing list is placed in each carton of assorted merchandise by the person packing it; and upon receipt the consignee verifies both the count of freight on the carrier's waybill and the packing list's entries for each carton. International shipments require many more documents. The typical number ranges from 6 to 10, but the number can climb to more than 50. For example, livestock must be accompanied by a veterinarian's inspection certificate. Documentation also links the shipment to payment for the product—a form of control necessary to ensure that goods are not shipped without regard to their being paid for. Electronic data interchange is often used in place of paper for the documentation process. Interplant movements During the production process a firm moves products between its various plants. A large automobile manufacturer might have several thousand suppliers feeding parts into 100 factories that assemble components that will be used by, say, 20 assembly lines. Flows must be controlled and altered to meet changing demands. The just-in-time (JIT) inventory replenishment system insists on small, accurate resupply deliveries to be made just as they are needed—no sooner and no later. Also, the components must be free of defects, because there is no batch of spare parts from which to pick a replacement. Inventories Stocks of goods or materials are inventories. They often are located at points where there is a change in the rate and unit of movement. A grain elevator might receive grain from local farmers at the rate of two or three truckloads a day during the harvest season and hold the grain until it is shipped out at the rate of several railcars a week over a six-month period. Inventories represent an investment that the owner hopes to sell. (Sometimes they represent an “involuntary” investment that occurs when goods are produced faster than they are sold.) There are costs associated with holding inventories, however, including interest on the money invested in the inventory, storage costs, and risks of deterioration, obsolescence, and shrinkage. A dealer holding this year's automobiles suffers a loss in inventory value when next year's models are announced, because the autos in the inventory are now “one year old” in the buyers' eyes. Inventory “shrinkage” is the term that acknowledges and measures the fact that most inventory records show more goods have entered an inventory than can be found. Many different classes of products are kept in a firm's inventory. They include company supplies, finished goods (made by the firm), packaging materials, labels, promotional materials (catalogs and samples), raw materials and components, resale goods (purchased from other firms for resale—e.g., a firm that manufactures vacuum cleaners may buy vacuum bags from an outside source), returned goods made by others, returned products made by the firm, s and waste to be disposed of, s and waste to be recycled, spare parts, traded-in goods of a competitor's brand, traded-in goods of one's own brand, and work-in-process goods. Inventory must be rotated, or “turned,” with new units replacing old ones. This is referred to as the FIFO (first in–first out) system. Storage and selling racks are often arranged so that the oldest item moves out first. Rotation is especially important in the food industry, where many items are perishable, and even packaged goods have expiration or “pull” dates on them because the manufacturer does not want them sold after a certain date. For products that might be traded internationally, there are additional inventory classifications: the country of origin, because import duties or charges sometimes vary by country of origin; countries where goods can be sold (e.g., some foreign automobiles cannot be sold in the United States because of emission control requirements); and the specific languages used on the product or package or in catalogs.
    2014-07-17 21:07:38

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Documentation flow The paperwork that accompanies the flow of physical product is considered to be the documentation flow. A bill of lading is the contract between the shipper and carrier. A packing list is placed in each carton of assorted merchandise by the person packing it; and upon receipt the consignee verifies both the count of freight on the carrier's waybill and the packing list's entries for each carton. International shipments require many more documents. The typical number ranges from 6 to 10, but the number can climb to more than 50. For example, livestock must be accompanied by a veterinarian's inspection certificate. Documentation also links the shipment to payment for the product—a form of control necessary to ensure that goods are not shipped without regard to their being paid for. Electronic data interchange is often used in place of paper for the documentation process. Interplant movements During the production process a firm moves products between its various plants. A large automobile manufacturer might have several thousand suppliers feeding parts into 100 factories that assemble components that will be used by, say, 20 assembly lines. Flows must be controlled and altered to meet changing demands. The just-in-time (JIT) inventory replenishment system insists on small, accurate resupply deliveries to be made just as they are needed—no sooner and no later. Also, the components must be free of defects, because there is no batch of spare parts from which to pick a replacement. Inventories Stocks of goods or materials are inventories. They often are located at points where there is a change in the rate and unit of movement. A grain elevator might receive grain from local farmers at the rate of two or three truckloads a day during the harvest season and hold the grain until it is shipped out at the rate of several railcars a week over a six-month period. Inventories represent an investment that the owner hopes to sell. (Sometimes they represent an “involuntary” investment that occurs when goods are produced faster than they are sold.) There are costs associated with holding inventories, however, including interest on the money invested in the inventory, storage costs, and risks of deterioration, obsolescence, and shrinkage. A dealer holding this year's automobiles suffers a loss in inventory value when next year's models are announced, because the autos in the inventory are now “one year old” in the buyers' eyes. Inventory “shrinkage” is the term that acknowledges and measures the fact that most inventory records show more goods have entered an inventory than can be found. Many different classes of products are kept in a firm's inventory. They include company supplies, finished goods (made by the firm), packaging materials, labels, promotional materials (catalogs and samples), raw materials and components, resale goods (purchased from other firms for resale—e.g., a firm that manufactures vacuum cleaners may buy vacuum bags from an outside source), returned goods made by others, returned products made by the firm, s and waste to be disposed of, s and waste to be recycled, spare parts, traded-in goods of a competitor's brand, traded-in goods of one's own brand, and work-in-process goods. Inventory must be rotated, or “turned,” with new units replacing old ones. This is referred to as the FIFO (first in–first out) system. Storage and selling racks are often arranged so that the oldest item moves out first. Rotation is especially important in the food industry, where many items are perishable, and even packaged goods have expiration or “pull” dates on them because the manufacturer does not want them sold after a certain date. For products that might be traded internationally, there are additional inventory classifications: the country of origin, because import duties or charges sometimes vary by country of origin; countries where goods can be sold (e.g., some foreign automobiles cannot be sold in the United States because of emission control requirements); and the specific languages used on the product or package or in catalogs.
    2014-07-17 21:07:37

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Correct.
      2014-08-24 14:08:13
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Documentation flow The paperwork that accompanies the flow of physical product is considered to be the documentation flow. A bill of lading is the contract between the shipper and carrier. A packing list is placed in each carton of assorted merchandise by the person packing it; and upon receipt the consignee verifies both the count of freight on the carrier's waybill and the packing list's entries for each carton. International shipments require many more documents. The typical number ranges from 6 to 10, but the number can climb to more than 50. For example, livestock must be accompanied by a veterinarian's inspection certificate. Documentation also links the shipment to payment for the product—a form of control necessary to ensure that goods are not shipped without regard to their being paid for. Electronic data interchange is often used in place of paper for the documentation process. Interplant movements During the production process a firm moves products between its various plants. A large automobile manufacturer might have several thousand suppliers feeding parts into 100 factories that assemble components that will be used by, say, 20 assembly lines. Flows must be controlled and altered to meet changing demands. The just-in-time (JIT) inventory replenishment system insists on small, accurate resupply deliveries to be made just as they are needed—no sooner and no later. Also, the components must be free of defects, because there is no batch of spare parts from which to pick a replacement. Inventories Stocks of goods or materials are inventories. They often are located at points where there is a change in the rate and unit of movement. A grain elevator might receive grain from local farmers at the rate of two or three truckloads a day during the harvest season and hold the grain until it is shipped out at the rate of several railcars a week over a six-month period. Inventories represent an investment that the owner hopes to sell. (Sometimes they represent an “involuntary” investment that occurs when goods are produced faster than they are sold.) There are costs associated with holding inventories, however, including interest on the money invested in the inventory, storage costs, and risks of deterioration, obsolescence, and shrinkage. A dealer holding this year's automobiles suffers a loss in inventory value when next year's models are announced, because the autos in the inventory are now “one year old” in the buyers' eyes. Inventory “shrinkage” is the term that acknowledges and measures the fact that most inventory records show more goods have entered an inventory than can be found. Many different classes of products are kept in a firm's inventory. They include company supplies, finished goods (made by the firm), packaging materials, labels, promotional materials (catalogs and samples), raw materials and components, resale goods (purchased from other firms for resale—e.g., a firm that manufactures vacuum cleaners may buy vacuum bags from an outside source), returned goods made by others, returned products made by the firm, s and waste to be disposed of, s and waste to be recycled, spare parts, traded-in goods of a competitor's brand, traded-in goods of one's own brand, and work-in-process goods. Inventory must be rotated, or “turned,” with new units replacing old ones. This is referred to as the FIFO (first in–first out) system. Storage and selling racks are often arranged so that the oldest item moves out first. Rotation is especially important in the food industry, where many items are perishable, and even packaged goods have expiration or “pull” dates on them because the manufacturer does not want them sold after a certain date. For products that might be traded internationally, there are additional inventory classifications: the country of origin, because import duties or charges sometimes vary by country of origin; countries where goods can be sold (e.g., some foreign automobiles cannot be sold in the United States because of emission control requirements); and the specific languages used on the product or package or in catalogs.
    2014-07-17 21:07:19

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Absolutely
      2014-08-24 14:08:31
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Documentation flow The paperwork that accompanies the flow of physical product is considered to be the documentation flow. A bill of lading is the contract between the shipper and carrier. A packing list is placed in each carton of assorted merchandise by the person packing it; and upon receipt the consignee verifies both the count of freight on the carrier's waybill and the packing list's entries for each carton. International shipments require many more documents. The typical number ranges from 6 to 10, but the number can climb to more than 50. For example, livestock must be accompanied by a veterinarian's inspection certificate. Documentation also links the shipment to payment for the product—a form of control necessary to ensure that goods are not shipped without regard to their being paid for. Electronic data interchange is often used in place of paper for the documentation process. Interplant movements During the production process a firm moves products between its various plants. A large automobile manufacturer might have several thousand suppliers feeding parts into 100 factories that assemble components that will be used by, say, 20 assembly lines. Flows must be controlled and altered to meet changing demands. The just-in-time (JIT) inventory replenishment system insists on small, accurate resupply deliveries to be made just as they are needed—no sooner and no later. Also, the components must be free of defects, because there is no batch of spare parts from which to pick a replacement. Inventories Stocks of goods or materials are inventories. They often are located at points where there is a change in the rate and unit of movement. A grain elevator might receive grain from local farmers at the rate of two or three truckloads a day during the harvest season and hold the grain until it is shipped out at the rate of several railcars a week over a six-month period. Inventories represent an investment that the owner hopes to sell. (Sometimes they represent an “involuntary” investment that occurs when goods are produced faster than they are sold.) There are costs associated with holding inventories, however, including interest on the money invested in the inventory, storage costs, and risks of deterioration, obsolescence, and shrinkage. A dealer holding this year's automobiles suffers a loss in inventory value when next year's models are announced, because the autos in the inventory are now “one year old” in the buyers' eyes. Inventory “shrinkage” is the term that acknowledges and measures the fact that most inventory records show more goods have entered an inventory than can be found. Many different classes of products are kept in a firm's inventory. They include company supplies, finished goods (made by the firm), packaging materials, labels, promotional materials (catalogs and samples), raw materials and components, resale goods (purchased from other firms for resale—e.g., a firm that manufactures vacuum cleaners may buy vacuum bags from an outside source), returned goods made by others, returned products made by the firm, s and waste to be disposed of, s and waste to be recycled, spare parts, traded-in goods of a competitor's brand, traded-in goods of one's own brand, and work-in-process goods. Inventory must be rotated, or “turned,” with new units replacing old ones. This is referred to as the FIFO (first in–first out) system. Storage and selling racks are often arranged so that the oldest item moves out first. Rotation is especially important in the food industry, where many items are perishable, and even packaged goods have expiration or “pull” dates on them because the manufacturer does not want them sold after a certain date. For products that might be traded internationally, there are additional inventory classifications: the country of origin, because import duties or charges sometimes vary by country of origin; countries where goods can be sold (e.g., some foreign automobiles cannot be sold in the United States because of emission control requirements); and the specific languages used on the product or package or in catalogs.
    2014-07-17 21:07:04

  • Divine Bruce Kumi Ghana What will it imply if future users of a certain document ignored the approved or kept document?
    2014-07-06 13:07:09

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan They might loss direction and eventually fail in delivering their duties as required.
      2014-08-24 14:08:07
  • Asrat Zerihun Ethiopia Can a manager documented his project in his mind ?is thair a case for such documentation?
    2014-06-27 15:06:03

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Through physical records.
      2014-08-24 14:08:42
    • Ademola Babatunde Nigeria The disadvantage with such a form of documentation is the obstacle it creates for continuity. If the manager were to live his position, it would be hard for the successor to continue and also if not documented properly,the mind might change little details which might have huge impact subsequently since it is in a fluid form in the mind
      2014-07-10 14:07:59
    • Glyn Chapman United Kingdom It is not a defined requirement to produce documentation for projects however it is in their best interests to do so as a backup for any works and the processes/works performed
      2014-06-29 16:06:06
  • Satu Korhonen Finland What is good documentation?
    2014-06-24 15:06:36

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan It is clear and details to the users.
      2014-08-24 14:08:35
    • Raymond Siwale Botswana giving right information to right people
      2014-06-26 19:06:08
  • ODAFE PATRICK OHWOJERO Nigeria is it every project that needs documentation?
    2014-06-24 08:06:46

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes.
      2014-08-24 14:08:55
    • Raymond Siwale Botswana Yes for example.. u have a project to install an aircon. The technician needs install manual and the client needs the owners manual.
      2014-06-26 19:06:49
    • Satu Korhonen Finland Yes. Absolutely. Otherwise it isninpossible to know what has been done, how and why. If the project manager falls ill, for example, it is impossible to compensate this without good dokumentation
      2014-06-24 15:06:09
  • Reza Abbasi Iran It is different in every part of the documentation of a project?
    2014-06-22 15:06:59

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes different documentation is needed for specific use.
      2014-08-24 14:08:42
    • Satu Korhonen Finland I think yes, because th needs for dokumentation are different in every part and process.
      2014-06-24 15:06:13
  • Reza Abbasi Iran It is different in every part of the documentation of a project?
    2014-06-19 21:06:41

  • Annette Weizbauer Germany Is the documentation carried our throughout the Project?
    2014-06-14 10:06:39

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes of course.
      2014-08-24 14:08:13
    • Reza Abbasi Iran yes
      2014-06-19 21:06:06
    • ojo taiwo Nigeria yes
      2014-06-19 14:06:47
    • Parhalad Saini India yes the documentation carried our throughout the Project.
      2014-06-17 09:06:40
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