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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management


Comments about Project management toolset - Project management tools revision

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- Module: Project management toolset
- Topic: Project management tools revision

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  • Shopman Moyo South Africa Very good test to asses ones understanding.
    2014-11-23 12:11:57

  • Paul Goldstein Beecher Sierra Leone helping activity
    2014-11-22 18:11:48

  • Augustine Antwi-Boasiako Ghana Tricky activity
    2014-11-22 14:11:06

  • shady Maher Saudi Arabia Define P.M. TOOL SET?
    2014-11-18 19:11:26

  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya The project management tool are very critical for a successful project.
    2014-11-16 06:11:12

  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya The project management tool are very critical for a successful project.
    2014-11-16 04:11:48

  • Md Shohel Mahmud Bangladesh GANTT chart shows all the project activities from the beginning to the end with a time frame and activity plan and progress.
    2014-11-15 13:11:12

  • Franklin King Liberia The project management tools help to identify your fault and allows to improve
    2014-11-12 17:11:27

  • manase motimele South Africa With a good team a level headed mind, and all the necessary ground work of the project needs, and putting strategic plans in place for any back-sets, one can finish a project, incurring all the slack time, within the pre-planned time of completion.
    2014-11-04 15:11:08

  • Eugene Doris Nigeria project management tools give a clear picture and format on how the project will be carried out
    2014-10-29 16:10:45

  • Mackson Latiel Shawa United Arab Emirates project management tool set is very important because it gives the picture on how the project will be conducted.
    2014-10-28 14:10:18

  • Eskalehu Abeje wubu Ethiopia Project Manager Interview Questions By Dona DeZube, Monster Finance Careers Expert The best project managers are like axles -- they smoothly link management, clients and staff to keep projects rolling along. If you want to be the top candidate for a project manager job, make sure you can answer questions about your technical competence, business methodology and interpersonal skills in the job interview. Here’s a project plan to get ready for your next project management interview. Technical Skills and Methodology Your interviewer may begin by asking about your technical skills. An introductory question might be: •What software have you used to manage projects in the past? That question may be followed by a more specific query: •If I gave you a laptop to plan your next project, what software would you want on it? Once you’ve established your technical competence, expect questions about your methodology for handling projects, says Joseph Logan, author of Seven Simple Steps to Landing Your First Job. Whether you’re a Project Management Professional (PMP) or not, general questions you can expect include: •What’s your approach to managing a project? •What’s your school of thought on project management -- are you an agile person? •How do you do your scheduling? •How do you allocate resources? •How do you do status updates? “They have to have a methodology,” says Donna Farrugia, executive director of The Creative Group, a recruiting firm for interactive, design and marketing professionals in Menlo Park, California. “Maybe they use software or a book, or they just have years of experience.” If you are PMP-certified, discuss the certification process: when you earned your PMP, what the hardest part was for you, what you liked the most, etc. 2014-10-28 13:10:08 Reply . Eskalehu Abeje wubu Ethiopia Project management is a composite activity with multiple dimensions. Depending on the type and class of project this management activity can be very complex, not least because the typical project environment echoes the ‘fractal’ form of the common garden snail's shell. That is to say, the same approach can be applied at every level of the management hierarchy and only the size and branch of the activity changes. For example: on a very large project, it may well be subdivided into ‘sub-projects’ each of which is managed as a project in its own right. Strictly speaking, such a “large project” should be referred to as a program, but the analogy is not limited to large projects. The pieces of any sized project that are parceled out to otherwise independent operators can be considered, from their point of view, as a project which they own and manage. Similarly, the principles of project management can be applied to any level or branch of a project that falls under a different area of responsibility in the overall project organization. Under these circumstances, it is not too difficult to see that the problem of different agendas can arise and the overall goals of the project can become obscured as a result. We should also be clear on what we mean by project management, not in terms of the traditional definitions but in terms of the scope of this management activity. For purposes of this paper, we see a distinction between technical management and project management. Technical management is the business of managing the technology of the project whereas project management is the business of managing the entire endeavor through its project life cycle process. While we draw this distinction, in the real world the two must be fully integrated but the combination varies between different project management application areas. In the literature, there is a wealth of information describing projects in all areas of application, what was achieved, how it was achieved and how successful were the results. Similarly, there is a wealth of literature providing advice on how to do project management – and presumably do it better. Based on this experiential material, various attempts have been made to assemble ‘bodies of knowledge’ and thereby articulate the role and content of project management1,2,3. Such documents have been used in several countries for the development of individual certification and competence testing, and/or by enterprises for establishing corporate standards of practice. In contrast, there appears to be very little content establishing basic ‘principles’ and theories to support them. This absence suggests that the building of a project management discipline is presently based only on experiential records and opinion and not on any reasonably logical or theoretical foundation. Ideally, Page 2 AEW Services, Vancouver, BC, © Novemmber 2000 Email: max_wideman@sfu.ca what is needed is a generally agreed and testable set of elemental ‘principles’ of project management which provide a universal reference basis for a set of generally acceptable ‘practices’. To emphasize that we wish to focus on the founding principles of project management, we will use the term ‘First Principles’. It may be asked “Do we really need a set of ‘First Principles of Project Management’”? The problem is that within a corporate environment, understaffing is generally considered good business practice. However, projects require contingency allowances to accommodate the inevitable uncertainty involved so that the practice of under-resourcing is a recipe for failure. Hence the need to promulgate a set of generally agreed fundamentals. So what should be included as a ‘First Principle’? The key appears to be whether or not the principle is universally fundamental to project success. (See additional comments under Discussion: First Principles Generally.) However, the meaning of project success, like a number of other key terms, is debatable. So, in order to lay a foundation for this discussion, we commence with definitions for the leading terminology we use in this paper. 2014-10-28 13:10:46 Reply . Nothando Gumpo United Kingdom GANNT charts are very useful tool in project management. They make it easy to keep your focus and plan ahead 2014-10-27 20:10:24 Reply . Ben Simon Tanzania It is my first time to have this knowledge on PERT diagram. I do appreciate 2014-10-25 10:10:40 Reply . Masila Cornellius Kenya Am really grateful for Alison courses. they have really quenched my academic thirsty and here i am, am nothing else but success in what i wish to attain in project management. thank you. 2014-10-20 06:10:39 Reply . Owan Manyo Ayuk Walters Cameroon OK. Nice 2014-10-16 15:10:37 Reply . Sunday Sayepe Nigeria This is really interesting. I now understand why, despite being the older, most Project Managers prefer to use GANTT chart over PERT. It creates a straight forward pattern that can be easily followed. 2014-10-15 10:10:22 Reply . Owan Manyo Ayuk Walters Cameroon This is a good check up. The exercise have test my mastery of the course so far. This is virtually a good footing. 2014-10-12 19:10:05 Reply . George Ugim Nigeria what must first be put in place when constructing a GHANTT chart? 2014-10-08 20:10:53 Reply . Connie Mwema Botswana Can technology also be considered while estimating activity time? 2014-09-23 10:09:45 Reply . REAGAN IKIE Zaire yes of course 2014-10-02 10:10:38 Ko Ko Oo Singapore Need the experiences also. 2014-09-29 08:09:12 ANNETTE ROBINSON United States of America Would you revise the Project with the same tool that was initially chosen? 2014-09-08 21:09:43 Reply . Francis Kakwetin Lesingo Kenya Critical path method ; Does the sequences of systematic in such a way that one does not jump one activity before doing the first in series ? 2014-08-08 15:08:55 Reply . Kenneth M Akahoho Ghana yes because some activity has to be done before other start 2014-10-21 23:10:27 Zulfikar Bhanji Kenya Yes and even if it did there the realistic time frame which you could re-arrange depending on the time frame 2014-09-02 13:09:28 Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes. 2014-08-24 13:08:01 Je Rouse United Kingdom I think that I prefer the GANNT method as this fits the types of projects that I am involved with 2014-08-07 14:08:46 Reply . REAGAN IKIE Zaire i have the same point of view with you because hability to have knowledge of critical way 2014-10-02 10:10:34 George Fragos Greece I think so.. 2014-08-30 14:08:05 Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Both are necessary for project success. 2014-08-24 13:08:50 neil mafi Zimbabwe but be careful of missing the interlinking dependency of events and earning an average result 2014-08-08 09:08:16 Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana In this context it is correct? A GANTT chart displays tasks along a horizontal time scale. GANTT charts should show the best possible way to complete the task in the shortest time. Activities can be done in parallel or sequentially, and the GANTT chart shows this clearly. PERT diagrams or critical path networks, on the other hand, use a graphical form to show relationships between activities and time frame On a PERT diagram network Grid lines show the interdependence of events and the critical path is used to show the sequence of events that have the sum of the longest duration. To allow for uncertainty when organizations are estimating activity times, three estimates are provided, the pessimisti. time, the most probable time and the optimistic time. 2014-07-26 05:07:03 Reply . Kenneth M Akahoho Ghana yes that is correct 2014-10-21 23:10:19 Zulfikar Bhanji Kenya I tend to agree though I would look at the historical date with what has happened in the past at similar projects just as a view on time frame 2014-09-02 13:09:02 Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes that is very true. 2014-08-24 13:08:12 neil mafi Zimbabwe in essence the GANTT chart is the foundation to planning and projection and in this case the PERT 2014-08-08 09:08:32 Janvier Nyandamu Rwanda o 2014-07-22 17:07:04 Reply . Vikram Vasant Rotkar United Kingdom What is risk appetite? 2014-07-21 14:07:47 Reply . Zulfikar Bhanji Kenya This could be put in two ways risk can pay of in big ways like in a war or it could go wrong in a situation like freeing of hostages both have windows of opening and closing 2014-09-02 13:09:25 Yai Deng Yai South Sudan This the burning desire for risk. 2014-08-24 13:08:00 Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management Both during and after World War II the United States operated the largest and most advanced logistic system in the world. Its wartime operations stressed speed, volume, and risk-taking more than efficiency and economy. The postwar years, with accelerated technological change, skyrocketing costs, and diminished public interest in defense, brought a revulsion against military prodigality, manifested by calls for reduced defense budgets and a growing demand for more efficient management of the military establishment. This demand culminated in a thorough overhaul of the whole system in the 1960s. One result was the reorganization of logistic activities in the three military services, generally along functional lines, with large logistic commands operating under functional staff supervision. In each service, however, each major weapon system was centrally managed by a separate project officer, and central inventory control was maintained for large commodity groups. In 1961 a new defense supply agency was established to manage on a wholesale basis the procurement, storage, and distribution of common military supplies and the administration of certain common services. The most far-reaching managerial reforms of the period were instituted by the U.S. defense secretary, Robert S. McNamara (1961–68), in the resource allocation process. A unified defense planning–programming–budgeting system provided for five-year projections of force, manpower, and dollar requirements for all defense activities, classified into eight or nine major programs (such as strategic forces) that cut across the lines of traditional service responsibilities. The system was introduced in other federal departments after 1965, and elements of it were adopted by the British and other governments. In 1966 a program was inaugurated to integrate management accounting at the operating level with the programming–budgeting system. At the end of the 1960s a new administration restored some of the initiative in the planning–budgeting–programming cycle to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the military services. The reforms of the 1960s exploited the whole range of current managerial methodology. The basic techniques, such as systems and operations analysis, all stressed precise, scientific, usually quantitative formulations of problems and mathematical approaches to rational decision making. Systems analysis, the technique associated with defense planning and programming, was a method of economic and mathematical analysis useful in dealing with complex problems of choice under conditions of uncertainty. The technological foundation of this improved logistic management was the high-speed electronic computer, which was being used chiefly in inventory control; in automated operations at depots, bases, and stations; in transmitting and processing supply data; in personnel administration; and in command-and-control networks. 2014-07-17 19:07:15 Reply . Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Correct. 2014-08-24 13:08:45 Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management Both during and after World War II the United States operated the largest and most advanced logistic system in the world. Its wartime operations stressed speed, volume, and risk-taking more than efficiency and economy. The postwar years, with accelerated technological change, skyrocketing costs, and diminished public interest in defense, brought a revulsion against military prodigality, manifested by calls for reduced defense budgets and a growing demand for more efficient management of the military establishment. This demand culminated in a thorough overhaul of the whole system in the 1960s. One result was the reorganization of logistic activities in the three military services, generally along functional lines, with large logistic commands operating under functional staff supervision. In each service, however, each major weapon system was centrally managed by a separate project officer, and central inventory control was maintained for large commodity groups. In 1961 a new defense supply agency was established to manage on a wholesale basis the procurement, storage, and distribution of common military supplies and the administration of certain common services. The most far-reaching managerial reforms of the period were instituted by the U.S. defense secretary, Robert S. McNamara (1961–68), in the resource allocation process. A unified defense planning–programming–budgeting system provided for five-year projections of force, manpower, and dollar requirements for all defense activities, classified into eight or nine major programs (such as strategic forces) that cut across the lines of traditional service responsibilities. The system was introduced in other federal departments after 1965, and elements of it were adopted by the British and other governments. In 1966 a program was inaugurated to integrate management accounting at the operating level with the programming–budgeting system. At the end of the 1960s a new administration restored some of the initiative in the planning–budgeting–programming cycle to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the military services. The reforms of the 1960s exploited the whole range of current managerial methodology. The basic techniques, such as systems and operations analysis, all stressed precise, scientific, usually quantitative formulations of problems and mathematical approaches to rational decision making. Systems analysis, the technique associated with defense planning and programming, was a method of economic and mathematical analysis useful in dealing with complex problems of choice under conditions of uncertainty. The technological foundation of this improved logistic management was the high-speed electronic computer, which was being used chiefly in inventory control; in automated operations at depots, bases, and stations; in transmitting and processing supply data; in personnel administration; and in command-and-control networks. 2014-07-17 19:07:04 Reply . Zulfikar Bhanji Kenya Yes but it also depends on the availability of tools and intelligence reports which must be taken in account 2014-09-02 13:09:37 Yai Deng Yai South Sudan I agree. 2014-08-24 13:08:02 Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management Both during and after World War II the United States operated the largest and most advanced logistic system in the world. Its wartime operations stressed speed, volume, and risk-taking more than efficiency and economy. The postwar years, with accelerated technological change, skyrocketing costs, and diminished public interest in defense, brought a revulsion against military prodigality, manifested by calls for reduced defense budgets and a growing demand for more efficient management of the military establishment. This demand culminated in a thorough overhaul of the whole system in the 1960s. One result was the reorganization of logistic activities in the three military services, generally along functional lines, with large logistic commands operating under functional staff supervision. In each service, however, each major weapon system was centrally managed by a separate project officer, and central inventory control was maintained for large commodity groups. In 1961 a new defense supply agency was established to manage on a wholesale basis the procurement, storage, and distribution of common military supplies and the administration of certain common services. The most far-reaching managerial reforms of the period were instituted by the U.S. defense secretary, Robert S. McNamara (1961–68), in the resource allocation process. A unified defense planning–programming–budgeting system provided for five-year projections of force, manpower, and dollar requirements for all defense activities, classified into eight or nine major programs (such as strategic forces) that cut across the lines of traditional service responsibilities. The system was introduced in other federal departments after 1965, and elements of it were adopted by the British and other governments. In 1966 a program was inaugurated to integrate management accounting at the operating level with the programming–budgeting system. At the end of the 1960s a new administration restored some of the initiative in the planning–budgeting–programming cycle to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the military services. The reforms of the 1960s exploited the whole range of current managerial methodology. The basic techniques, such as systems and operations analysis, all stressed precise, scientific, usually quantitative formulations of problems and mathematical approaches to rational decision making. Systems analysis, the technique associated with defense planning and programming, was a method of economic and mathematical analysis useful in dealing with complex problems of choice under conditions of uncertainty. The technological foundation of this improved logistic management was the high-speed electronic computer, which was being used chiefly in inventory control; in automated operations at depots, bases, and stations; in transmitting and processing supply data; in personnel administration; and in command-and-control networks. 2014-07-17 19:07:49 Reply . Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management Both during and after World War II the United States operated the largest and most advanced logistic system in the world. Its wartime operations stressed speed, volume, and risk-taking more than efficiency and economy. The postwar years, with accelerated technological change, skyrocketing costs, and diminished public interest in defense, brought a revulsion against military prodigality, manifested by calls for reduced defense budgets and a growing demand for more efficient management of the military establishment. This demand culminated in a thorough overhaul of the whole system in the 1960s. One result was the reorganization of logistic activities in the three military services, generally along functional lines, with large logistic commands operating under functional staff supervision. In each service, however, each major weapon system was centrally managed by a separate project officer, and central inventory control was maintained for large commodity groups. In 1961 a new defense supply agency was established to manage on a wholesale basis the procurement, storage, and distribution of common military supplies and the administration of certain common services. The most far-reaching managerial reforms of the period were instituted by the U.S. defense secretary, Robert S. McNamara (1961–68), in the resource allocation process. A unified defense planning–programming–budgeting system provided for five-year projections of force, manpower, and dollar requirements for all defense activities, classified into eight or nine major programs (such as strategic forces) that cut across the lines of traditional service responsibilities. The system was introduced in other federal departments after 1965, and elements of it were adopted by the British and other governments. In 1966 a program was inaugurated to integrate management accounting at the operating level with the programming–budgeting system. At the end of the 1960s a new administration restored some of the initiative in the planning–budgeting–programming cycle to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the military services. The reforms of the 1960s exploited the whole range of current managerial methodology. The basic techniques, such as systems and operations analysis, all stressed precise, scientific, usually quantitative formulations of problems and mathematical approaches to rational decision making. Systems analysis, the technique associated with defense planning and programming, was a method of economic and mathematical analysis useful in dealing with complex problems of choice under conditions of uncertainty. The technological foundation of this improved logistic management was the high-speed electronic computer, which was being used chiefly in inventory control; in automated operations at depots, bases, and stations; in transmitting and processing supply data; in personnel administration; and in command-and-control networks. 2014-07-17 19:07:31 Reply . TopicsModulesTextNotes Previous Next Project management toolset -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Project Management Tools PERT diagrams (network diagrams) Estimating activity time Scheduling and expediting Critical Path Method Project management tools revision Project management overview 3 / 3 Project management methodology 6 / 6 Project management toolset 6 / 6 Project management documentation 0 / 10 System development life cycle 0 / 7 The planning phase 0 / 13 The analysis phase 0 / 10 The design phase 0 / 8 The implementation phase 0 / 7 The use/evaluation phase 0 / 6 Project management case study 0 / 1 Information Technology case study 0 / 1 Toolset case study 0 / 1 GANTT charts case study 0 / 1 Documentation case study 0 / 1 System development life cycle case study 0 / 1 The planning phase case study 0 / 1 Feasibility study case study 0 / 1 The planning phase case study 0 / 1 The analysis phase case study 0 / 1 The analysis phase case study 2 0 / 1 The design phase case study 0 / 1 Implementation phase case study 1 0 / 1 Implementation phase case study 2 0 / 1 Evaluation phase case study 0 / 1 Implementation phase case study 0 / 1 Case study conclusion 0 / 1 Project Management Assessment 0 / 1 Project management overview 3 / 3 Project management methodology 6 / 6 Project management toolset 6 / 6 Project management documentation 0 / 10 System development life cycle 0 / 7 The planning phase 0 / 13 The analysis phase 0 / 10 The design phase 0 / 8 The implementation phase 0 / 7 The use/evaluation phase 0 / 6 Project management case study 0 / 1 Information Technology case study 0 / 1 Toolset case study 0 / 1 GANTT charts case study 0 / 1 Documentation case study 0 / 1 System development life cycle case study 0 / 1 The planning phase case study 0 / 1 Feasibility study case study 0 / 1 The planning phase case study 0 / 1 The analysis phase case study 0 / 1 The analysis phase case study 2 0 / 1 The design phase case study 0 / 1 Implementation phase case study 1 0 / 1 Implementation phase case study 2 0 / 1 Evaluation phase case study 0 / 1 Implementation phase case study 0 / 1 Case study conclusion 0 / 1 Project Management Assessment 0 / 1 XSIQ * Information Technology - Project management tools revision Revision Try the Project Management tools revision activity to revise what you have learned so far. Question: You and a group of three friends are planning the end of year party for Year 12s. Construct a GANTT chart for this. Be sure to consider events that could occur simultaneously as well as dependent events, i.e. those that must be done before others start. Estimate the time for each event. Previous | Next -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- My Notes Print X My Progress 17.02% .Rate The Course 4/512345Share The Course .
    2014-10-28 13:10:03

  • Eskalehu Abeje wubu Ethiopia Project Manager Interview Questions By Dona DeZube, Monster Finance Careers Expert The best project managers are like axles -- they smoothly link management, clients and staff to keep projects rolling along. If you want to be the top candidate for a project manager job, make sure you can answer questions about your technical competence, business methodology and interpersonal skills in the job interview. Here’s a project plan to get ready for your next project management interview. Technical Skills and Methodology Your interviewer may begin by asking about your technical skills. An introductory question might be: •What software have you used to manage projects in the past? That question may be followed by a more specific query: •If I gave you a laptop to plan your next project, what software would you want on it? Once you’ve established your technical competence, expect questions about your methodology for handling projects, says Joseph Logan, author of Seven Simple Steps to Landing Your First Job. Whether you’re a Project Management Professional (PMP) or not, general questions you can expect include: •What’s your approach to managing a project? •What’s your school of thought on project management -- are you an agile person? •How do you do your scheduling? •How do you allocate resources? •How do you do status updates? “They have to have a methodology,” says Donna Farrugia, executive director of The Creative Group, a recruiting firm for interactive, design and marketing professionals in Menlo Park, California. “Maybe they use software or a book, or they just have years of experience.” If you are PMP-certified, discuss the certification process: when you earned your PMP, what the hardest part was for you, what you liked the most, etc.
    2014-10-28 13:10:08

  • Eskalehu Abeje wubu Ethiopia Project management is a composite activity with multiple dimensions. Depending on the type and class of project this management activity can be very complex, not least because the typical project environment echoes the ‘fractal’ form of the common garden snail's shell. That is to say, the same approach can be applied at every level of the management hierarchy and only the size and branch of the activity changes. For example: on a very large project, it may well be subdivided into ‘sub-projects’ each of which is managed as a project in its own right. Strictly speaking, such a “large project” should be referred to as a program, but the analogy is not limited to large projects. The pieces of any sized project that are parceled out to otherwise independent operators can be considered, from their point of view, as a project which they own and manage. Similarly, the principles of project management can be applied to any level or branch of a project that falls under a different area of responsibility in the overall project organization. Under these circumstances, it is not too difficult to see that the problem of different agendas can arise and the overall goals of the project can become obscured as a result. We should also be clear on what we mean by project management, not in terms of the traditional definitions but in terms of the scope of this management activity. For purposes of this paper, we see a distinction between technical management and project management. Technical management is the business of managing the technology of the project whereas project management is the business of managing the entire endeavor through its project life cycle process. While we draw this distinction, in the real world the two must be fully integrated but the combination varies between different project management application areas. In the literature, there is a wealth of information describing projects in all areas of application, what was achieved, how it was achieved and how successful were the results. Similarly, there is a wealth of literature providing advice on how to do project management – and presumably do it better. Based on this experiential material, various attempts have been made to assemble ‘bodies of knowledge’ and thereby articulate the role and content of project management1,2,3. Such documents have been used in several countries for the development of individual certification and competence testing, and/or by enterprises for establishing corporate standards of practice. In contrast, there appears to be very little content establishing basic ‘principles’ and theories to support them. This absence suggests that the building of a project management discipline is presently based only on experiential records and opinion and not on any reasonably logical or theoretical foundation. Ideally, Page 2 AEW Services, Vancouver, BC, © Novemmber 2000 Email: max_wideman@sfu.ca what is needed is a generally agreed and testable set of elemental ‘principles’ of project management which provide a universal reference basis for a set of generally acceptable ‘practices’. To emphasize that we wish to focus on the founding principles of project management, we will use the term ‘First Principles’. It may be asked “Do we really need a set of ‘First Principles of Project Management’”? The problem is that within a corporate environment, understaffing is generally considered good business practice. However, projects require contingency allowances to accommodate the inevitable uncertainty involved so that the practice of under-resourcing is a recipe for failure. Hence the need to promulgate a set of generally agreed fundamentals. So what should be included as a ‘First Principle’? The key appears to be whether or not the principle is universally fundamental to project success. (See additional comments under Discussion: First Principles Generally.) However, the meaning of project success, like a number of other key terms, is debatable. So, in order to lay a foundation for this discussion, we commence with definitions for the leading terminology we use in this paper.
    2014-10-28 13:10:46

  • Nothando Gumpo United Kingdom GANNT charts are very useful tool in project management. They make it easy to keep your focus and plan ahead
    2014-10-27 20:10:24

  • Ben Simon Tanzania It is my first time to have this knowledge on PERT diagram. I do appreciate
    2014-10-25 10:10:40

  • Masila Cornellius Kenya Am really grateful for Alison courses. they have really quenched my academic thirsty and here i am, am nothing else but success in what i wish to attain in project management. thank you.
    2014-10-20 06:10:39

  • Owan Manyo Ayuk Walters Cameroon OK. Nice
    2014-10-16 15:10:37

  • Sunday Sayepe Nigeria This is really interesting. I now understand why, despite being the older, most Project Managers prefer to use GANTT chart over PERT. It creates a straight forward pattern that can be easily followed.
    2014-10-15 10:10:22

  • Owan Manyo Ayuk Walters Cameroon This is a good check up. The exercise have test my mastery of the course so far. This is virtually a good footing.
    2014-10-12 19:10:05

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