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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management

Comments about Project management toolset - Critical Path Method

The comment must be about:
- Module: Project management toolset
- Topic: Critical Path Method

Latest Comments

  • Nothando Gumpo United Kingdom Critical path methods is very critical phase of any project on being completed on time.
    2014-10-27 19:10:37

  • Ralph Webster South Africa Critical Path Method The critical path is a series of activities which are vital to the event being completed on time. These are the essential action steps and costs to get the project completed. For example, a delay in one event will delay the completion of the project.
    2014-10-19 06:10:26

  • Haque Nawaz Saudi Arabia How the critical path of a project changes?
    2014-09-28 10:09:32

  • ANNETTE ROBINSON United States of America Shouldn't a contingency plan be in place or a plan B?
    2014-09-08 20:09:32

  • George Fragos Greece can we save time from another event and complete our project on time?
    2014-08-30 14:08:55

    • Serah Mwinzila Kenya Especially save time for critical path which will subsequently improve the finish time of the overall project.
      2014-09-27 17:09:55
    • Alonso da Costa Sebastiao Namibia I believe so. The more time e save the better, therefore saving time on one event and allocating it to another may help reduce the totall time on the project, and may end up saving money, and I assume it will allow you time to make sure everything is up to standard.
      2014-09-03 04:09:46
  • Lukong Terence Cameroon how does a manager determine a task as being critical in a given project????
    2014-08-21 10:08:06

    • Serah Mwinzila Kenya When you sum up the times in a sequence of events and appears to be higher than any other sequence of events.Then that particular line of events is said to be on a critical path.
      2014-09-27 17:09:26
    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan When it cannot be finished its given time.
      2014-08-24 12:08:19
  • ARIHO SIMPLISIO Uganda should all project managers use it
    2014-08-20 08:08:16

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes.
      2014-08-24 12:08:43
    • Wilson B Kagabo Rwanda Not as a commandment but as a good professional practice.
      2014-08-23 10:08:54
  • Janine Phillips Australia Critical path method is based on mathematical calculations and it is used for scheduling project activities - this method can be used for any project where there are interdependent activities. It was first introduced in 1950s as a joint venture between Remington Rand Corporation and DuPont Corporation. Heaps of information about it online but my preference is GANTT.
    2014-08-08 22:08:33

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan You are right man.
      2014-08-24 12:08:31
    • Saw Minyau Germany Janine Phillips, Could you explain more detail in mathematical calculation?
      2014-08-14 09:08:57
  • Je Rouse United Kingdom this is bit brief, is there more information available?
    2014-08-07 14:08:48

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes you free to look for more informationas much as you want.
      2014-08-24 12:08:33
  • WAYNE MUNSON United Kingdom Very limited information on CPM can more information be made available
    2014-08-03 08:08:50

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan This question is directed to who my friend Wayne Munson? you conern is valid but I comment you ask Alison team of tutors and experts to given more ideas on this tool.
      2014-08-24 12:08:08
  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana If a delay in one event this project could delay it completely, then I suggest it must be wisely noted to avoid breaches and or contract termination.
    2014-07-26 05:07:09

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan I wonder what you are trying to say here Samuael Kofi Odoi!
      2014-08-24 12:08:37
  • Abraham Wanyonyi Uganda Do we have study (notes) materials available for this very caurse
    2014-07-25 12:07:18

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan I don't know?
      2014-08-24 12:08:05
    • Wilson B Kagabo Rwanda I think whatever you are able to see - on these slides, is what is available.
      2014-08-23 10:08:24
  • Vikram Vasant Rotkar United Kingdom What is the recommended as a possible risk in terms of time?
    2014-07-21 14:07:54

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Expedite.
      2014-08-24 12:08:01
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management Both during and after World War II the United States operated the largest and most advanced logistic system in the world. Its wartime operations stressed speed, volume, and risk-taking more than efficiency and economy. The postwar years, with accelerated technological change, skyrocketing costs, and diminished public interest in defense, brought a revulsion against military prodigality, manifested by calls for reduced defense budgets and a growing demand for more efficient management of the military establishment. This demand culminated in a thorough overhaul of the whole system in the 1960s. One result was the reorganization of logistic activities in the three military services, generally along functional lines, with large logistic commands operating under functional staff supervision. In each service, however, each major weapon system was centrally managed by a separate project officer, and central inventory control was maintained for large commodity groups. In 1961 a new defense supply agency was established to manage on a wholesale basis the procurement, storage, and distribution of common military supplies and the administration of certain common services. The most far-reaching managerial reforms of the period were instituted by the U.S. defense secretary, Robert S. McNamara (1961–68), in the resource allocation process. A unified defense planning–programming–budgeting system provided for five-year projections of force, manpower, and dollar requirements for all defense activities, classified into eight or nine major programs (such as strategic forces) that cut across the lines of traditional service responsibilities. The system was introduced in other federal departments after 1965, and elements of it were adopted by the British and other governments. In 1966 a program was inaugurated to integrate management accounting at the operating level with the programming–budgeting system. At the end of the 1960s a new administration restored some of the initiative in the planning–budgeting–programming cycle to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the military services. The reforms of the 1960s exploited the whole range of current managerial methodology. The basic techniques, such as systems and operations analysis, all stressed precise, scientific, usually quantitative formulations of problems and mathematical approaches to rational decision making. Systems analysis, the technique associated with defense planning and programming, was a method of economic and mathematical analysis useful in dealing with complex problems of choice under conditions of uncertainty. The technological foundation of this improved logistic management was the high-speed electronic computer, which was being used chiefly in inventory control; in automated operations at depots, bases, and stations; in transmitting and processing supply data; in personnel administration; and in command-and-control networks.
    2014-07-17 19:07:02

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management Both during and after World War II the United States operated the largest and most advanced logistic system in the world. Its wartime operations stressed speed, volume, and risk-taking more than efficiency and economy. The postwar years, with accelerated technological change, skyrocketing costs, and diminished public interest in defense, brought a revulsion against military prodigality, manifested by calls for reduced defense budgets and a growing demand for more efficient management of the military establishment. This demand culminated in a thorough overhaul of the whole system in the 1960s. One result was the reorganization of logistic activities in the three military services, generally along functional lines, with large logistic commands operating under functional staff supervision. In each service, however, each major weapon system was centrally managed by a separate project officer, and central inventory control was maintained for large commodity groups. In 1961 a new defense supply agency was established to manage on a wholesale basis the procurement, storage, and distribution of common military supplies and the administration of certain common services. The most far-reaching managerial reforms of the period were instituted by the U.S. defense secretary, Robert S. McNamara (1961–68), in the resource allocation process. A unified defense planning–programming–budgeting system provided for five-year projections of force, manpower, and dollar requirements for all defense activities, classified into eight or nine major programs (such as strategic forces) that cut across the lines of traditional service responsibilities. The system was introduced in other federal departments after 1965, and elements of it were adopted by the British and other governments. In 1966 a program was inaugurated to integrate management accounting at the operating level with the programming–budgeting system. At the end of the 1960s a new administration restored some of the initiative in the planning–budgeting–programming cycle to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the military services. The reforms of the 1960s exploited the whole range of current managerial methodology. The basic techniques, such as systems and operations analysis, all stressed precise, scientific, usually quantitative formulations of problems and mathematical approaches to rational decision making. Systems analysis, the technique associated with defense planning and programming, was a method of economic and mathematical analysis useful in dealing with complex problems of choice under conditions of uncertainty. The technological foundation of this improved logistic management was the high-speed electronic computer, which was being used chiefly in inventory control; in automated operations at depots, bases, and stations; in transmitting and processing supply data; in personnel administration; and in command-and-control networks.
    2014-07-17 19:07:17

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management Both during and after World War II the United States operated the largest and most advanced logistic system in the world. Its wartime operations stressed speed, volume, and risk-taking more than efficiency and economy. The postwar years, with accelerated technological change, skyrocketing costs, and diminished public interest in defense, brought a revulsion against military prodigality, manifested by calls for reduced defense budgets and a growing demand for more efficient management of the military establishment. This demand culminated in a thorough overhaul of the whole system in the 1960s. One result was the reorganization of logistic activities in the three military services, generally along functional lines, with large logistic commands operating under functional staff supervision. In each service, however, each major weapon system was centrally managed by a separate project officer, and central inventory control was maintained for large commodity groups. In 1961 a new defense supply agency was established to manage on a wholesale basis the procurement, storage, and distribution of common military supplies and the administration of certain common services. The most far-reaching managerial reforms of the period were instituted by the U.S. defense secretary, Robert S. McNamara (1961–68), in the resource allocation process. A unified defense planning–programming–budgeting system provided for five-year projections of force, manpower, and dollar requirements for all defense activities, classified into eight or nine major programs (such as strategic forces) that cut across the lines of traditional service responsibilities. The system was introduced in other federal departments after 1965, and elements of it were adopted by the British and other governments. In 1966 a program was inaugurated to integrate management accounting at the operating level with the programming–budgeting system. At the end of the 1960s a new administration restored some of the initiative in the planning–budgeting–programming cycle to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the military services. The reforms of the 1960s exploited the whole range of current managerial methodology. The basic techniques, such as systems and operations analysis, all stressed precise, scientific, usually quantitative formulations of problems and mathematical approaches to rational decision making. Systems analysis, the technique associated with defense planning and programming, was a method of economic and mathematical analysis useful in dealing with complex problems of choice under conditions of uncertainty. The technological foundation of this improved logistic management was the high-speed electronic computer, which was being used chiefly in inventory control; in automated operations at depots, bases, and stations; in transmitting and processing supply data; in personnel administration; and in command-and-control networks.
    2014-07-17 19:07:57

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management Both during and after World War II the United States operated the largest and most advanced logistic system in the world. Its wartime operations stressed speed, volume, and risk-taking more than efficiency and economy. The postwar years, with accelerated technological change, skyrocketing costs, and diminished public interest in defense, brought a revulsion against military prodigality, manifested by calls for reduced defense budgets and a growing demand for more efficient management of the military establishment. This demand culminated in a thorough overhaul of the whole system in the 1960s. One result was the reorganization of logistic activities in the three military services, generally along functional lines, with large logistic commands operating under functional staff supervision. In each service, however, each major weapon system was centrally managed by a separate project officer, and central inventory control was maintained for large commodity groups. In 1961 a new defense supply agency was established to manage on a wholesale basis the procurement, storage, and distribution of common military supplies and the administration of certain common services. The most far-reaching managerial reforms of the period were instituted by the U.S. defense secretary, Robert S. McNamara (1961–68), in the resource allocation process. A unified defense planning–programming–budgeting system provided for five-year projections of force, manpower, and dollar requirements for all defense activities, classified into eight or nine major programs (such as strategic forces) that cut across the lines of traditional service responsibilities. The system was introduced in other federal departments after 1965, and elements of it were adopted by the British and other governments. In 1966 a program was inaugurated to integrate management accounting at the operating level with the programming–budgeting system. At the end of the 1960s a new administration restored some of the initiative in the planning–budgeting–programming cycle to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the military services. The reforms of the 1960s exploited the whole range of current managerial methodology. The basic techniques, such as systems and operations analysis, all stressed precise, scientific, usually quantitative formulations of problems and mathematical approaches to rational decision making. Systems analysis, the technique associated with defense planning and programming, was a method of economic and mathematical analysis useful in dealing with complex problems of choice under conditions of uncertainty. The technological foundation of this improved logistic management was the high-speed electronic computer, which was being used chiefly in inventory control; in automated operations at depots, bases, and stations; in transmitting and processing supply data; in personnel administration; and in command-and-control networks.
    2014-07-17 19:07:19

  • Divine Bruce Kumi Ghana A delay in one aspect of an event leads to delay in total completion, will that demand special skilled or not to be determined by the project manager?
    2014-06-27 15:06:25

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan It can be corrected by PM.
      2014-08-24 12:08:47
  • salwa kamara Ghana What are the benefits of a Critical Path Method (CPM)?
    2014-06-25 13:06:02

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan It shows interdependent in activities and that delay in one activity might lead to delay in another activity.
      2014-08-24 12:08:55
  • ODAFE PATRICK OHWOJERO Nigeria at what point in the project do the project manage needs critical path method?
    2014-06-23 09:06:19

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan At the planning phase and at production phase.
      2014-08-24 12:08:48
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