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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management

Questions & Answers about Project management toolset - Estimating activity time

The Question must be about:
- Module: Project management toolset
- Topic: Estimating activity time

Latest Questions

  • Ige Omoluakhe Urowayino Greece what is historical data
    2014-08-24 19:08:39

    • George Fragos Greece old/past information about a company, used to help forecast the company's future; for example, historical price, price/earnings ratio, revenues and revenue growth, earnings and earnings growth.
      2014-08-30 15:08:01
  • Tesfaye Tessema Gintamo Ethiopia How can we estimate activity time in a normal conditions project management?
    2014-08-21 20:08:41

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Is done through planning and consultation with stakeholders and experts.
      2014-08-24 13:08:49
  • Lukong Terence Cameroon Does each task in a project warrant a team task leader as regard respecting the activity timing ?????
    2014-08-21 11:08:36

  • Saw Minyau Germany Is there any effect if the project not in timing schedule?
    2014-08-14 10:08:15

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes the management of the project would not achieve the objective since there are timing for activities.
      2014-08-24 13:08:39
    • Tesfaye Tessema Gintamo Ethiopia Yes,because the project by itself time,budget and resources bounded so that without timing schedule the project ,, will encore high investment cost
      2014-08-21 20:08:26
    • ARIHO SIMPLISIO Uganda yes because it lead to bureaucracy
      2014-08-20 09:08:01
    • aula Al Helfe Iraq sure it will destroy the project cos you have time to hand over the project so any delay will make you loss money and your name
      2014-08-15 21:08:00
    • Engr Ace Philippines Yes, it greatly affects the project budget particularly if the client is budget conscious.
      2014-08-15 18:08:17
  • Je Rouse United Kingdom if the project hasnt been done before can you estimate the timings, based on something similar?
    2014-08-07 15:08:47

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes.
      2014-08-24 13:08:22
    • aula Al Helfe Iraq ya you can do that but you should make some free time for any delay cos you never did it before ..
      2014-08-15 21:08:17
  • WAYNE MUNSON United Kingdom Would you still go on historical data if using a new contractor whom you have never dealt with before.
    2014-08-03 09:08:53

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes and also you can do close monitoring.
      2014-08-24 13:08:36
  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana Yes when estimating a project, one must be realistic because duration of activity time varies and cost of materials might inflate. The manager would perhaps indicate historical, yet must be very realistic.
    2014-07-26 05:07:10

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Of course.
      2014-08-24 13:08:08
  • Janvier Nyandamu Rwanda What are the factors to take into account while estimating activity time?
    2014-07-22 17:07:41

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Project environment, stakeholders, project staff skills, resources, government policies,political stability, weather conditions and donor policies.
      2014-08-24 13:08:24
    • Tesfaye Tessema Gintamo Ethiopia 1. project location and accessibility 2. human and material resources availability 3.financial resources 4. weather conditions in the project area
      2014-08-21 20:08:57
  • Vikram Vasant Rotkar United Kingdom Does time influence the risk?
    2014-07-21 15:07:42

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes it time is too much there is a risk of slacking behind timing.
      2014-08-24 13:08:23
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management Both during and after World War II the United States operated the largest and most advanced logistic system in the world. Its wartime operations stressed speed, volume, and risk-taking more than efficiency and economy. The postwar years, with accelerated technological change, skyrocketing costs, and diminished public interest in defense, brought a revulsion against military prodigality, manifested by calls for reduced defense budgets and a growing demand for more efficient management of the military establishment. This demand culminated in a thorough overhaul of the whole system in the 1960s. One result was the reorganization of logistic activities in the three military services, generally along functional lines, with large logistic commands operating under functional staff supervision. In each service, however, each major weapon system was centrally managed by a separate project officer, and central inventory control was maintained for large commodity groups. In 1961 a new defense supply agency was established to manage on a wholesale basis the procurement, storage, and distribution of common military supplies and the administration of certain common services. The most far-reaching managerial reforms of the period were instituted by the U.S. defense secretary, Robert S. McNamara (1961–68), in the resource allocation process. A unified defense planning–programming–budgeting system provided for five-year projections of force, manpower, and dollar requirements for all defense activities, classified into eight or nine major programs (such as strategic forces) that cut across the lines of traditional service responsibilities. The system was introduced in other federal departments after 1965, and elements of it were adopted by the British and other governments. In 1966 a program was inaugurated to integrate management accounting at the operating level with the programming–budgeting system. At the end of the 1960s a new administration restored some of the initiative in the planning–budgeting–programming cycle to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the military services. The reforms of the 1960s exploited the whole range of current managerial methodology. The basic techniques, such as systems and operations analysis, all stressed precise, scientific, usually quantitative formulations of problems and mathematical approaches to rational decision making. Systems analysis, the technique associated with defense planning and programming, was a method of economic and mathematical analysis useful in dealing with complex problems of choice under conditions of uncertainty. The technological foundation of this improved logistic management was the high-speed electronic computer, which was being used chiefly in inventory control; in automated operations at depots, bases, and stations; in transmitting and processing supply data; in personnel administration; and in command-and-control networks.
    2014-07-17 20:07:37

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management Both during and after World War II the United States operated the largest and most advanced logistic system in the world. Its wartime operations stressed speed, volume, and risk-taking more than efficiency and economy. The postwar years, with accelerated technological change, skyrocketing costs, and diminished public interest in defense, brought a revulsion against military prodigality, manifested by calls for reduced defense budgets and a growing demand for more efficient management of the military establishment. This demand culminated in a thorough overhaul of the whole system in the 1960s. One result was the reorganization of logistic activities in the three military services, generally along functional lines, with large logistic commands operating under functional staff supervision. In each service, however, each major weapon system was centrally managed by a separate project officer, and central inventory control was maintained for large commodity groups. In 1961 a new defense supply agency was established to manage on a wholesale basis the procurement, storage, and distribution of common military supplies and the administration of certain common services. The most far-reaching managerial reforms of the period were instituted by the U.S. defense secretary, Robert S. McNamara (1961–68), in the resource allocation process. A unified defense planning–programming–budgeting system provided for five-year projections of force, manpower, and dollar requirements for all defense activities, classified into eight or nine major programs (such as strategic forces) that cut across the lines of traditional service responsibilities. The system was introduced in other federal departments after 1965, and elements of it were adopted by the British and other governments. In 1966 a program was inaugurated to integrate management accounting at the operating level with the programming–budgeting system. At the end of the 1960s a new administration restored some of the initiative in the planning–budgeting–programming cycle to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the military services. The reforms of the 1960s exploited the whole range of current managerial methodology. The basic techniques, such as systems and operations analysis, all stressed precise, scientific, usually quantitative formulations of problems and mathematical approaches to rational decision making. Systems analysis, the technique associated with defense planning and programming, was a method of economic and mathematical analysis useful in dealing with complex problems of choice under conditions of uncertainty. The technological foundation of this improved logistic management was the high-speed electronic computer, which was being used chiefly in inventory control; in automated operations at depots, bases, and stations; in transmitting and processing supply data; in personnel administration; and in command-and-control networks.
    2014-07-17 20:07:25

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Exactly.
      2014-08-24 13:08:03
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management Both during and after World War II the United States operated the largest and most advanced logistic system in the world. Its wartime operations stressed speed, volume, and risk-taking more than efficiency and economy. The postwar years, with accelerated technological change, skyrocketing costs, and diminished public interest in defense, brought a revulsion against military prodigality, manifested by calls for reduced defense budgets and a growing demand for more efficient management of the military establishment. This demand culminated in a thorough overhaul of the whole system in the 1960s. One result was the reorganization of logistic activities in the three military services, generally along functional lines, with large logistic commands operating under functional staff supervision. In each service, however, each major weapon system was centrally managed by a separate project officer, and central inventory control was maintained for large commodity groups. In 1961 a new defense supply agency was established to manage on a wholesale basis the procurement, storage, and distribution of common military supplies and the administration of certain common services. The most far-reaching managerial reforms of the period were instituted by the U.S. defense secretary, Robert S. McNamara (1961–68), in the resource allocation process. A unified defense planning–programming–budgeting system provided for five-year projections of force, manpower, and dollar requirements for all defense activities, classified into eight or nine major programs (such as strategic forces) that cut across the lines of traditional service responsibilities. The system was introduced in other federal departments after 1965, and elements of it were adopted by the British and other governments. In 1966 a program was inaugurated to integrate management accounting at the operating level with the programming–budgeting system. At the end of the 1960s a new administration restored some of the initiative in the planning–budgeting–programming cycle to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the military services. The reforms of the 1960s exploited the whole range of current managerial methodology. The basic techniques, such as systems and operations analysis, all stressed precise, scientific, usually quantitative formulations of problems and mathematical approaches to rational decision making. Systems analysis, the technique associated with defense planning and programming, was a method of economic and mathematical analysis useful in dealing with complex problems of choice under conditions of uncertainty. The technological foundation of this improved logistic management was the high-speed electronic computer, which was being used chiefly in inventory control; in automated operations at depots, bases, and stations; in transmitting and processing supply data; in personnel administration; and in command-and-control networks.
    2014-07-17 20:07:08

  • Alexander Njoku Nigeria yes
    2014-07-17 15:07:24

  • Daniel Chol Koknyin South Sudan If time estimates of each activity (s) is not done on time, what factors are involve?
    2014-07-04 13:07:02

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Adjustment and investigation would be initiated and well review and quick decision.
      2014-08-24 13:08:47
  • Divine Bruce Kumi Ghana Are historical data or experience the only guide to determine duration of a project?
    2014-06-27 15:06:30

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan There are also some other factors.
      2014-08-24 13:08:31
    • Daniel Singh Fiji There are a number of variables at play when determining the duration of a project. 1. Historical Data - based on continuing projects of similar nature. 2. Experience - of the project team and project manager. 3. Risk Factors - what issues will cause constraints to the project, thus prolonging various phases of the project. (Risk Management variables) 4. Human Resources - experienced and competent project team members will impact the delivery time. Sickness and death will need to be taken into account. 5.Availability of Resources or materials - the location of the projects will impact the time factor. One will need to consider how readily available is the materials and resources to complete the project. 6. Climatic conditions - this is very much a factor in construction and environment based projects. The above are just examples which can be considered depending on the nature and type of project. It all comes to experience and foresight of the project team during the planning stage.
      2014-06-30 00:06:54
  • ODAFE PATRICK OHWOJERO Nigeria why not just start a project and at the end of every task move on to the next one, why is time a factor?
    2014-06-23 10:06:14

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan It is part of manager role.
      2014-08-24 13:08:29
    • rami mokhtar Saudi Arabia go back to the phase 2 planing and design one of the point is "identifying which tasks can done insane time " some time in the project to finish it on time you should do more then task or activity in the same time .
      2014-07-01 20:07:18
    • Daniel Singh Fiji This is very much possible in projects in which the tasks are concurrent to each other. In more complicated projects, there are tasks which are tasks which are running parallel and concurrently at the same time. This needs to be reflected properly in the GANTT charts, thus during the planning stages. Therefore, time is an important factor which can be the difference between the success and failure of a project. If projects go past the required deadline, then cost increases. Failure to meet deadlines will start a chain reaction of decisions and actions that will cost the investors and sponsors of the project. It will also mean the loss of lives if the project was of a medical nature. So, time is a very important factor in project planning and analysis.
      2014-06-30 00:06:34
  • Reza Abbasi Iran What are the benefits estimates for the duration of the project?
    2014-06-22 15:06:27

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan In order to do accurate monitoring and supervision.
      2014-08-24 13:08:11
  • Reza Abbasi Iran What are the benefits estimates for the duration of the project?
    2014-06-19 20:06:31

  • Satu Korhonen Finland How does a project manager assign durations to tasks?
    2014-06-16 10:06:12

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Through planning.
      2014-08-24 13:08:42
    • ojo taiwo Nigeria ask yourself how long[realistically can it take to finish this task] if you dont have an idea, ask those who have done it before. for example the number of days to build a story building is not the same for a six storey building, WHY? then how would you estimate (shortest and longest) time required.if you have not undertaken the task before, I believe talking to those who have or are knowledgeable will help
      2014-06-19 13:06:14
  • Annette Weizbauer Germany Does a Project Manager have to think realistically when estimating the activity time?
    2014-06-14 10:06:37

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes of course.
      2014-08-24 13:08:10
    • Reza Abbasi Iran yes
      2014-06-19 20:06:02
    • ojo taiwo Nigeria YES, also note that it is time 'estimate'. that is why we have longest and shortest i.e on or before 30th of june 2014. estimating time must be done with possible constraints borne in mind
      2014-06-19 13:06:54
    • Parhalad Saini India yahaa he has experience of many project so he can estimate the activity time.
      2014-06-17 09:06:06
    • Poliect Chuwa Tanzania Exactly
      2014-06-16 02:06:37
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