Sign-up today to join over 4 million learners already on ALISON:

ALISON: Diploma in Project Management

Comments about Project management case study - Project management case study

The comment must be about:
- Module: Project management case study
- Topic: Project management case study

Latest Comments

  • Ralph Webster South Africa Once the system has been commissioned, we enter the final phase of the System Development Life Cycle. This is the use/evaluation phase. Computer based information systems should be built for a purpose, not just because we can. Consequently in the analysis and design phases we set goals that the system was to achieve. In this phase we evaluate how well those goals have been met and how the system can be further improved. There are a number of areas that are evaluated in this phase.
    2014-10-20 09:10:08

  • Linda Manzano United States of America More hours of work, better salary, experience and knowledge a different level.
    2014-10-10 03:10:37

  • George Fragos Greece more responsibility...more quality...higher salary.
    2014-10-08 07:10:40

  • Ossai Ifeakachukwu Nigeria I will be heading the project,draft out a documents and coordinating the duties with the others and report to the top management. Do my responsibilities of making sure all activities are finished in sequence , in time , comes within budget, meets it's goals and be a good leader and communicator, motivator and give information needed to do the jo
    2014-10-04 08:10:09

  • Segedin Dragan United Arab Emirates Job of Project Manager shouldn't be treated just as a job as working under pressure and remaining productive under pressure are for skilled people with experience. Not all PMs stay long on this position. And payments are not far from "ordinary" employees but responsibility is very big. Too many PMs just burned as were not ready to accept reality inside of environment (mostly one single company)
    2014-09-28 10:09:56

  • Khathi Bongiwe South Africa I will be heading the project and coordinating the duties with the others and report to the top management. Do my responsibilities of making sure all activities are finished in sequence , in time , comes within budget, meets it's goals and be a good leader and communicator, motivator and give information needed to do the job
    2014-09-25 18:09:02

  • Nicole Abrams United States of America My life would be better fianiacally. I would be helping a company to function properly.
    2014-09-13 15:09:59

  • Tendani Matumba South Africa If thinking on your feet, working under pressure and remaining productive under pressure is not your interest, then this course is not for you, unless you are willing to acquire the skills through training.
    2014-09-13 06:09:11

  • Percy Mwale Zambia Are project management skills applicable in all fields?
    2014-09-10 17:09:16

    • Godwin Kofi Dzakpasu Ghana Yes. every field carry out projects in almost all their activities.
      2014-09-11 16:09:05
  • ANNETTE ROBINSON United States of America Would the Project Manger have Leadership Skills and training?
    2014-09-08 23:09:18

  • Jacqualine K Mwale Botswana What could you expect if you were employed to use information processing and management techniques within a company?
    2014-07-28 08:07:21

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan I would expect to use wisely managerial skills and only provide accurate and reliable information.
      2014-08-26 20:08:01
  • Jacqualine K Mwale Botswana What would your life be like if you were employed as a Project Manager tomorrow? What are the qualities of a Project Manager?
    2014-07-28 08:07:26

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Planning, coordination of things, control of peole and resources and many more.
      2014-08-26 20:08:06
  • Robert Hesketh United Kingdom Great case study!
    2014-07-21 16:07:17

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 22:07:20

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 22:07:08

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 22:07:49

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 22:07:46

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 22:07:32

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 22:07:10

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 22:07:57

Loading Menu